A Nation of Outsiders: How the White Middle Class Fell in Love with Rebellion in Postwar America

By Grace Elizabeth Hale | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. Laslo Benedek, The Wild One (Columbia Pictures, 1953); Jack Kerouac, On the Road (1957; New York: Penguin, 2002), 179; Norman Mailer, “The White Negro,” (1957), in Advertisement for Myself (New York: Berkeley Publishing, 1966), 311–31, quote, 314; Tom Hayden, Reunion: A Memoir (New York: Random House, 1988), 40.

2. The John Cohen quote is in Tom Davenport and Barry Dornfeld, Remembering the High Lonesome (2003). The film and a transcript of the film are at http:// www.folkstreams.net. Robert Shelton, The Face of Folk Music (New York: Citadel Press, 1968), 41. Larry Cohn’s 1965 quote about Son House is in Lawrence Cohn, Nothing but the Blues: The Music and the Musicians (New York: Abbeville Press, 1993), 350. The Janis Joplin quote is in David Dalton, Piece of My Heart: A Portrait of Janis Joplin (New York: Da Capo, 1991), 38.

3. There is a large philosophical and theoretical literature on the meaning of authenticity, including Lionel Trilling, Sincerity and Authenticity (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1972); Charles Taylor, The Ethics of Authenticity (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1991); and Anthony Appiah, The Ethics of Identity (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2005). American historians, for the most part, have failed to historicize the term and think critically about its rapidly changing meanings in the postwar period. For an otherwise excellent history focused on the development of the New Left at the University of Texas at Austin, see Doug Rossinow, The Politics of Authenticity: Liberalism, Christianity, and the New Left in America (New York: Columbia University Press, 1998). For an intriguing and helpful sociological investigation, see David Grazian, Blue Chicago: The Search for Authenticity in Urban Blues Clubs (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003). Even business writers have taken up the topic: James Gilmore and Joseph Pine, Authenticity: What Consumers Really Want (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Business School Press, 2007). For a critique of the idea of community, see Miranda Joseph, Against the Romance of Community (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2002).

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