North of the Color Line: Migration and Black Resistance in Canada, 1870-1955

By Sarah-Jane Mathieu; Waldo E. Martin Jr. et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
Bonds of Steel

Depression, War, and International Brotherhood

Arthur Robinson Blanchette felt the sting of the Great Depression. Born in St. Vincent in 1910, the son of a prominent dentist, Blanchette lost his father in childhood, the victim of the Spanish influenza epidemic sweeping the globe during the Great War era.1 In 1927, he boarded a steamship for the United States, bound for medical studies at Howard University, then a crucial training ground for North America’s burgeoning caste of civil rights activists. Wide eyed and eager, Blanchette enjoyed campus life, as well as the prosperity and prestige that it promised, particularly for young black men.2 Regrettably, Blanchette’s funds dried up well before his thirst for knowledge ever did. Forced out of Howard before completing his intended degree, the frustrated Blanchette cut short his experiment with black campus life and did what thousands of other men and women did during the Great Depression: he got his first job.

Blanchette set off for Winnipeg in 1931 to join his namesake and uncle John Arthur Robinson, the most prominent black railway unionist in Canada. Despite being ousted from the rails because of his tenacious unionization efforts, Robinson still held enough clout to secure a summer portering position for his nephew on the Canadian Pacific Railway.3 The two Kittitians formed an immediately powerful bond. One a scholar and the other an activist, they exchanged ideas and strategies, wedded philosophy and pragmatism, and breathed new life into Winnipeg’s Depression-beaten black community. Robinson, by then also president of the Porter’s Social and Charitable Association, a racial uplift organization created to help blacks in

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
North of the Color Line: Migration and Black Resistance in Canada, 1870-1955
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.