The Long Road to Annapolis: The Founding of the Naval Academy and the Emerging American Republic

By William P. Leeman | Go to book overview

NOTES

A Note on Quotations from Primary Sources

I have preserved the original spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in all text quoted from eighteenth- or nineteenth-century sources with the following exception: abbreviations have been spelled out.


Abbreviations
ASP:MAU.S. Congress. American State Papers: Military Affairs. 7 vols. Washington, D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1832–61.
ASP:NAU.S. Congress. American State Papers: Naval Affairs. 4 vols. Washington, D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834–61.
CGU.S. Congress. Congressional Globe. 44 vols. Washington, D.C.: Blair and Rives, 1834–73.
CWMEarl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va.
HMLHagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, Del.
HSPHistorical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
LCLibrary of Congress, Washington, D.C.
MHSMassachusetts Historical Society, Boston
NANational Archives, Washington, D.C.
RGRecord Group
USMA U.S.Military Academy Library, West Point, N.Y.
USNANimitz Library, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.

Introduction

1. George Bancroft to S. A. Allibone, October 11, 1856, Bancroft Papers, MHS.

2. The annual number of visitors is from the U.S. Naval Academy’s Armel-Leftwich Visitor Center, e-mail correspondence with the author, July 1, 2004. The distinguished graduate information is from the U.S. Naval Academy website . On the integration of minorities and women at the academy, see Gelfand, Sea Change at Annapolis.

3. For the most detailed examinations of the academy’s origins, see Sweetman, U.S. Naval Academy, 3–17; Todorich, Spirited Years, 1–18; Soley, Historical Sketch, 7–61; Marshall, History of the United States Naval Academy, 11–18; Hart, “Founding of the United States Naval Academy”; Paullin, “Beginnings of the United States Naval Academy”; Brown, “Half Century of Frustration”; and Sturdy, “Establishment of the Naval School.”

4. My interpretation of nationalism is based primarily on the work of Benedict Anderson (Imagined Communities), who defines a nation as “an imagined political community” (p. 6), and Max Savelle (Seeds of Liberty), who characterizes nationalism as a “psychological phenomenon” (p. 554). My ideas have also been informed by Hans Kohn, Idea of Nationalism; Nagel, This Sacred Trust; Royster, A Revolutionary People at War; Colley, Britons; Waldstreicher, In the Midst of Perpetual Fetes; Potter, “The Historian’s Use of Nationalism and Vice Versa”; and

-243-

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The Long Road to Annapolis: The Founding of the Naval Academy and the Emerging American Republic
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - Armed Ambassadors 1
  • Prologue - The Maddest Idea in the World 11
  • Chapter 1 - Defending the New Republic 19
  • Chapter 2 - Learning the Ropes 49
  • Chapter 3 - A West Point for the Navy? 69
  • Chapter 4 - Academies and Aristocracy in Andrew Jackson’s America 101
  • Chapter 5 - The Sword and the Pen 127
  • Chapter 6 - Mutiny, Midshipmen, and the Middle Class 163
  • Chapter 7 - Annapolis 195
  • Epilogue - Homecoming 231
  • Appendix 239
  • Notes 243
  • Bibliography 269
  • Index 283
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