The Long Shadow of the Civil War: Southern Dissent and Its Legacies

By Victoria E. Bynum | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I can never adequately acknowledge all those who have assisted or encouraged me in the writing of this book, particularly since some of its research was conducted twenty-five years ago. More than I ever imagined it would, The Long Shadow of the Civil War has evolved into a sampler of the major historical events and issues that have fascinated me since I first discovered the joys of archival research as a college undergraduate. Along the way, I have met and exchanged ideas with an amazing number of people.

The first person to thank is Gregg Andrews, my husband and colleague, who has shared my journeys into the past like no one else. Gregg’s own fascination with Newt Knight and the Free State of Jones inspired him to write and perform (as Dr. G and the Mudcats) “Jones County Jubilee,” the signature song for my website, Renegade South. Our partnership is truly the best part of being a historian!

Several independent writers have shared ideas and resources with me, none more so than historian Ed Payne of Jackson, Mississippi, and I thank him for his generosity, friendship, and moral support over the years. Likewise, novelist Jonathan Odell of Minneapolis, Minnesota, has inspired me with essays and drafts of his own works-in-progress, while supporting my own efforts to understand Mississippi’s turbulent past.

Many individuals, including Sondra Yvonne Bivins, Florence Knight Blaylock, B. T. Collins Jr., Donnis and Keith Lyon, Wynona Green Frost, Dorothy Lyon Thomas, Dianne Walkup, and Kenneth Welch, shared their research files with me, providing materials as crucial to this volume as any held in archives and libraries. Photographs, documents, family stories, and

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