We Have a Religion: The 1920s Pueblo Indian Dance Controversy and American Religious Freedom

By Tisa Wenger | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book could never have been completed without the assistance of the mentors, colleagues, and friends who have so generously supported my research and writing along the way. Ann Taves first inspired my interest in American religious history, provided critical feedback and encouragement on an early version of this manuscript, and has continued to serve as a mentor and inspiration for all my work. At Princeton University I benefited from the warm and collegial environment of the Department of Religion, where Leigh Eric Schmidt taught me how to be a historian of American religion and has continued to be an exceptional mentor ever since. Along with him, Albert J. Raboteau, Robert Wuthnow, Jeffrey Stout, Davíd Carrasco, and R. Marie Griffith offered invaluable advice and support in the early stages of this project. Tom Bremer, Wendy Cadge, Leslie Callahan, and Jenny Wiley Legath have given me the gift of their friendship and encouragement as well as critical readings of this work at various stages in its development. Thanks also to Patricia Bogdziewicz, Lorraine Fuhrman, and Anita Kline, who smoothed the way for all my work at Princeton. Princeton’s Center for the Study of Religion provided financial support along with the opportunity to discuss my research. I am indebted to the participants in CSR’s Religion and Culture Workshop in 2001–2 and 2003–4 for their advice and support.

Friends and colleagues from around the country have helped me develop my thinking for this book. I will be forever grateful to the incomparable Katie Lofton, who offered incisive critiques on every chapter as I wrote and did more than anyone to bolster my spirits when I was most discouraged. I benefited immensely from the opportunity to present my research at annual meetings of the American Academy of Religion, the American Society of Church History, the Berkshire Women’s History Conference, the Organization of American Historians, and the Society for the Anthropology of Religion. For their counsel at these and other forums I especially wish to thank David Daily, Pamela Klassen, Joel Martin, Michael McNally, L. G. Moses, and Inés Talamantez. As reviewers for the University of North Carolina

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
We Have a Religion: The 1920s Pueblo Indian Dance Controversy and American Religious Freedom
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 333

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.