We Have a Religion: The 1920s Pueblo Indian Dance Controversy and American Religious Freedom

By Tisa Wenger | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Published Primary Sources

For archival sources consulted, see the list of abbreviations at the beginning of the notes.

Archdiocese of Santa Fe. Press Release, August 16, 2003.

Austin, Mary. The American Rhythm. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1923.

———. Earth Horizon: Autobiography. New York: Houghton MiΔin, 1932.

———. Taos Pueblo, Photographed by Ansel Easton Adams and Described by Mary Austin. San Francisco: Grabhorn Press, 1930.

Austin, Mary, and T. M. Pearce. Literary America, 1903–1934: The Mary Austin Letters. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1979.

Baird, Robert. Religion in America; or, An account of the origin, progress, relation to the state, and present condition of the evangelical churches in the United States: with notices of the unevangelical denominations. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1845.

Bandelier, Adolph Francis Alphonse. The Delight Makers. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1918.

Benedict, Ruth. Patterns of Culture. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1989.

Board of Indian Commissioners. Annual Report of the Board of Indian Commissioners. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1896.

Boas, Franz. The Ethnography of Franz Boas: Letters and Diaries of Franz Boas Written on the Northwest Coast from 1886 to 1931. Edited by Ronald Rohner. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1969.

———. The Mind of Primitive Man. New York: Macmillan, 1911.

Bourke, John Gregory. The Snake-Dance of the Moquis of Arizona. New York: C. Scribner’s Sons, 1884.

Brown, J. Newton, and B. B. Edwards. Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge; or, Dictionary of the Bible, Theology, Religious Biography, All Religions, Ecclesiastical History, and Missions. Brattleboro, Vt.: Brattleboro’ Typographic Company, 1842.

Burlin, Natalie Curtis. The Indians’ Book. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1923.

Cather, Willa. Death Comes for the Archbishop. 1927; Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1999.

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