We Have a Religion: The 1920s Pueblo Indian Dance Controversy and American Religious Freedom

By Tisa Wenger | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abeita, Pablo (Isleta Pueblo), 104 (ill.); biography, 102–3; on Bursum Bill, 105, 106, 112, 115–17; criticizes reformers, 103–5, 122, 169; on dance circular, 146–47
Acoma Pueblo, 21–24, 197, 206
Advisory Council on Indian Affairs. See Committee of One Hundred
Albuquerque Indian School, 55, 66
Allegations of immorality: made by assimilationists, 44–45, 135–43, 151–54, 164–65; rejected by Pueblo Indians, 135–36, 190– 91, 203–4; as reflection of cultural disputes, 142–43, 154–55; rejected by reformers, 157–60, 165–68
All-Pueblo Council. See Council of All the New Mexico Pueblos
American Indian Defense Association: founding and priorities of, 113, 126, 128, 169; and Pueblo land disputes, 133, 206; on Indian tradition and religious freedom, 192–93, 195, 225, 228, 232–34, 236; on Indian health care, 222. See also Collier, John; Modernists
American Indian Movement (AIM), 240. See also Red Power movement
American Indian Religious Freedom Act, 242, 247, 257
Anthropologists: define Indian religion, 4, 41– 43, 54–55, 63–64, 239, 256, 258, 265–66; involvement in Indian affairs, 7, 112–13, 169–70; and primitivism, 8, 125, 149; mistrusted by Indians, 27, 187; and civilizing programs, 42–43, 64, 137; defend Pueblo traditions, 136, 141, 157, 159, 162, 167, 179– 80, 186; and cultural artifacts, 246–49, 250–52. See also Benedict, Ruth; Boas, Franz; Cushing, Frank Hamilton; Hewett, Edgar Lee; Hodge, Frederick Webb; Kroeber, Alfred; Mooney, James; Morgan, Lewis Henry; Parsons, Elsie Clews; Social evolutionary theory; Stevenson, Matilda Coxe
Anti-Catholicism, 29–30, 32–34, 50–51, 62, 144, 160
Apache Indians, 31, 258–59
Artists and writers: depict Pueblos and Pueblo religion, 1–2, 4, 59–61, 90–92, 125–26; involvement in Indian affairs, 7, 112–13, 137–38, 211; and primitivism, 8, 71–73, 122–24, 148–49, 156, 160–61, 191, 216–17; secularism among, 64, 70, 89–90, 92; in Taos and Santa Fe art colonies, 70–71, 81– 82; and Indian arts, 93–94; criticized by Indians and assimilationists, 103–4, 171, 172–73, 196, 202–3, 208, 212; defend Pueblo traditions, 118, 136, 159. See also Austin, Mary; Couse, E. Irving; Lawrence, D. H.; Luhan, Mabel Dodge; Lummis, Charles Fletcher; Modernists; Sloan, John
Assimilation: ideology of, 7–8, 30, 35–36; policies attacked, 117–18, 123–25, 148–50, 159–60, 179–80; debated among moderate and modernist reformers, 125–28, 157. See also Bureau of Indian Affairs; U.S. Indian policy
Assimilationist reformers: allied with Pueblo progressives, 9–10, 100, 201–4, 205–6, 208; link Christianity and civilization, 29– 30, 35–36, 41–42, 45, 47, 220; reform priorities of, 38–39, 43–47, 137–40; justify colonialist policies, 40–41, 216–20, 222; on Indian ceremonies, 43–45, 135–37, 143–45, 151–55, 168, 217–20; and Pueblo

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