White Enough to Be American? Race Mixing, Indigenous People, and the Boundaries of State and Nation

By Lauren L. Basson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Where do I begin? I am tremendously grateful to all of the people and institutions whose support has contributed to the writing and publication of this book, a process that has taken more than a decade to complete. Naming a few of my supporters will inevitably mean leaving others unnamed. My gratitude extends to all.

First and forest I thank Joel S. Migdal my trustworthy and inspirational mentor. Joel’s confidence in me and my ideas, and his steady support and guidance throughout the long years I spent working on this project have been the key to my ability to see it through from start to finish. My profound gratitude extends beyond words. I wish that every young academic could be as blessed as I have been to have a mentor like Joel.

There are numerous other scholars who have assisted with this project in all sorts of ways, from teaching me important courses to engaging me in thought-provoking conversations, to reading and commenting on drafts of different portions of this manuscript. I would especially like to thank Christine Di Stefano and Michael McCann, who provided invaluable advice on former incarnations of this project. I would also like to thank the many faculty members from the Jackson School of International Studies and the Department of Political Science at the University of Washington who contributed both informally and formally to the development of the ideas I present in this book.

I am also profoundly grateful to my Israeli colleagues who have provided me with the supportive environment that has enabled me to complete this book over the past few years. In particular, I wish to thank Aref Abu-Rabia whose confidence in my ideas and strong support allowed me to launch my academic career in Israel. Aref’s support was instrumental in allowing me to obtain both doctoral and postdoctoral grants at key junctions that helped keep this project alive. I would also like to thank all of my wonderful colleagues in the Department of Politics and Government at Ben-Gurion University. They provide a stimulating and nurturing academic environment that allows interdisciplinary scholars like me to thrive. I have had the good fortune to meet and exchange ideas with numerous other scholars throughout Israel over the past six years. I am grateful to them all.

A number of foundations and institutions have provided vital support to this project. Over the past several years, I have been the grateful recipient of a Fulbright scholarship, a Lady Davis fellowship at Hebrew Univer

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