White Enough to Be American? Race Mixing, Indigenous People, and the Boundaries of State and Nation

By Lauren L. Basson | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1 A review of the congressional documents concerning the Traversee case shows that Traversee’s name was spelled multiple ways. These include Traversee, Travirsie, Travissie, Travisee, Travissee, Travirsiee, Traversie, and Travirsee. Although Traversee is one of the more common spellings, Travirsie is also very common. According to Jim Nelson from the Timber Lake and Area Historical Museum, South Dakota, “Traversie” was the accepted local spelling (personal communication, December 29, 2006).

2 Works that address the intersections between racism and U.S. imperialism include Drinnon 1990, Horsman 1981, Jacobson 2000, McFerson 1997, and Weston 1972.

3 For examples of the new literature on borderlands, see Anzaldua 1999, Cayton and Teute 1998, and R. White 1991. For the conventional frontier thesis, see F. Turner 1920.

4 See Rose 1994, 267–304, on the importance of visible boundaries in the maintenance of property regimes.

5 See Rice 1998, on internalized racism among “mixed bloods.”

6 Yasemin Soysal (2000, 22) has suggested that singularity versus multiplicity is one of the defining differences between what she calls “national” and “postnational” citizenship.

7 See Gross 1998 on racial performances in legal settings in the nineteenth century.

8 See, e.g., Balibar and Wallerstein 1991, El-Tayeb 1999, Linke 1999, McClintock 1997, Perea 1998, Silverman 1992, Todorov 1993, and Wieviorka 1992.

9 See, e.g., Arnesen et al. 2001; Dominguez 1986; Haney Lopez 1996; Jacobson 1998, 2000; Kolchin 2002; Lipsitz 1995; Roediger 1991; Sheridan 1999; Twine 1996; and Warren and Twine 1997.

10 See, e.g., Deloria 1998, Ngai 2004, and Shah 2001.

11 See, e.g., Alcoff 1995, Bost 2003, Dominguez 1986, El-Tayeb 1999, Guttierez 1995, Kennedy and Ullman 2003, Moran 2001, Stoler 2002, Wald 1995, and O. White 1999.

12 For discussions of mixed marriage and racial mixture as unique social experiences or individual psychological phenomena, see, e.g., Barron 1946, 1972; Berger and Hill 1998; Johnson and Warren 1994; Root 1996; and Zack 1995.

-195-

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