Nations of Nothing but Poetry: Modernism, Transnationalism, and Synthetic Vernacular Writing

By Matthew Hart | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

Heraclitus, Fragments, trans. T. M. Robinson (Toronto and Buffalo: U. Toronto P., 1991), 41.

1. Gertrude Stein, Three Lives (New York: Penguin, 1990), 86. Hereafter cited parenthetically as TL.

2. Gertrude Stein, Lectures in America (Boston: New Beacon, 1967), 231.

3. W. E. B. DuBois, “The Talented Tenth,” in The Negro Problem: A Series of Articles by Representative American Negroes of Today (New York: James Pott & Co., 1903), 32–75.

4. Richard Wright, “Gertrude Stein’s Stay Is Drenched in Hitler’s Horrors,” PM’s Sunday Magazine Section (March 11, 1945), M15. Hereafter cited parenthetically as “GSS.”

5. Gwendolyn Brooks, A Street in Bronzeville (New York: Harper Brothers, 1945), 21.

6. Langston Hughes, Collected Poems of Langston Hughes, ed. Arnold Rampersad (New York: Vintage, 1994), 129.

7. Quoted in Ann Charters, Introduction to TL, xv; ellipsis in original. See the discussion of Eliot’s blackface correspondence with Pound in Michael North, The Dialect of Modernism: Race, Language, and Twentieth-Century Literature (New York: Oxford U. P., 1994), 77–78. For Eliot’s racist and bawdy “Bolo” poems, see T. S. Eliot, Inventions of the March Hare: Poems 1909–17, ed. Christopher Ricks (London: Faber, 1996), 315–21.

8. North, Dialect of Modernism, 27.

9. The preceding two sentences follow Charters, Introduction to TL, xiv–xviii.

10. Houston A. Baker, Jr., Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance (Chicago: U. Chicago P., 1987), xv.

11. For a similar response to Baker, see Charles W. Pollard, New World Modernisms: T. S. Eliot, Derek Walcott, and Kamau Brathwaite (Charlottesville: U. P. of Virginia, 2004), 17–19. A note on critical vocabulary: I use “agonistic” in its basic sense of “struggle,” not in the sense of a tutelary antithesis, as laid out in Harold Bloom’s The Anxiety of Influence: A Theory of Poetry (Oxford: Oxford U. P., 1973).

-191-

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