Using Technology to Unlock Musical Creativity

By Scott Watson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

BACK IN 1999 when I was wrapping up my doctoral degree in composition, having just written as my dissertation project an almost 20-minute Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra and an accompanying 60-page “monograph” to explain the work, I remember telling my wife, Kim, “That was one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to do.” Having spent the last year assembling this book on a technology-centered, creativity-based approach to music learning, I now have one more thing to add to that list. I never could have completed either task without the help and support of many special people.

I would like to thank Oxford University Press for believing in this project, and my editor, Norman Hirschy, for his guidance and advocacy. I appreciate my primary employer over the last quarter-century, the Parkland School District (Allentown, PA), for providing an environment in which I could grow, and take risks, as an educator. Many administrators and colleagues have been both encouraging and instructive. I appreciate the university music programs and their directors, who have given me the opportunity to teach courses to in-service and pre-service music teachers, developing and sharing many of the ideas in this book (Villanova University, George Pinchock; Central Connecticut State University, Drs. Pam Perry and Charles Menoche; and Philadelphia Biblical University, Dr. Paul Isensee). TI:ME (Technology for Music Educators) has played a prominent role in opening my eyes to the possibilities for using technology with students. I am indebted to, and value the friendship of, inspiring music teachers such as TI:ME’s founder and former president, Dr. Thomas Rudolph, current President, Amy Burns, and Vice President, Dr. James Frankel. Other professional colleagues who have so generously shared their work products, anecdotes, web materials, and advice used in this book include Brian Balmages (composer and editor, FJH Publications), Nancy Beitler (Southern Lehigh Middle School, Coopersburg, PA), Dr. Rick Dammers (Rowan University, NJ), Barbara Freedman (Greenwich High School, CT), Jill Crissy-Kemmerer (Parkland School District, PA), Dr. Sandi McLeod (Vermont MIDI Project), Dr. Joseph Pisano (Grove City College, PA), Wayne Splettstoeszer (Torrington High School,

-vii-

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