Using Technology to Unlock Musical Creativity

By Scott Watson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
PRINCIPLE 1: ALLOW STUDENTS TO SHARE THEMSELVES

WHAT THEY LIKE AND WHO THEY ARE

MOST KIDS SIMPLY LOVE to tell others, especially their teacher, about themselves. One way they can do this is by sharing what they like in music. Allowing students to share their passion for music, or a certain kind of music, can be a great motivator. For many students, the music they listen to contributes to their sense of identity, how they view themselves and want to be viewed by others.


My Favorite Things Podcast

In my high school music production class, I teach a project called “My Favorite Things Podcast” in which students create an audio podcast to tell about some kind of music they like. If you don’t know what a podcast is, don’t fret. A podcast is a lot like talk radio, where a host talks about virtually any topic. If the topic is music, the host may share sound clips to amplify the topic. For this project, students artfully string together several short audio clips of their favorite artist (or band, or composer, etc.) and then record a simple voice-over narration to provide a little background and explain what they find so compelling about the music they are presenting. Today’s music technology makes creating the clips and recording the voice-overs very easy. Topics put forward for this project by past students have varied wildly and include favorite solo artists and bands, or favorite composers—you would be surprised at the music your students listen to and admire.

One of my favorites was called “A Tribute to the Newmans.” This podcast by high schooler Julian S. tapped his love of film music, and particularly music by the Newman dynasty of Hollywood film composers (Alfred, his sons Thomas and David, and their cousin, Randy). The podcast begins with the 20th Century Fox theme and includes short clips of music from the film Scent of a Woman (score by Thomas Newman), the song “Dayton Ohio, 1903” (by Randy Newman), and the film The Egyptian (score by Alfred Newman). Julian narrates, introducing each clip with modest explanations, yet I learned much from the podcast about Julian’s musical sensibilities. No prodding at all was required to

-26-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Using Technology to Unlock Musical Creativity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.