Collect and Record! Jewish Holocaust Documentation in Early Postwar Europe

By Laura Jockusch | Go to book overview

5
Joining Forces to Comprehend
the Jewish Catastrophe
The Attempt to Establish a European Community
of Holocaust Researchers

Each of the Jewish documentation initiatives that arose throughout postwar Europe operated under unique conditions, responding to such factors as the ethnic and religious composition of the surrounding society, its history and political institutions, and its recent experience of war and occupation. Nonetheless, the cataclysm that had decimated Jewish communities in twenty-one countries under the control of Nazi Germany or its allies impelled cooperation among the activists and their institutions across national borders. The westward migration of Polish activists in itself led to an exchange of documentation experience. One of the most notable of these migrants, Philip Friedman, observed in October 1947 that only a “collective of scholars” could manage “a deeper, critical, and analytical treatment, and a synthesized coverage of all the complicated economic, social, cultural, and demographic problems and events” of the Holocaust.1 That December, representatives of Jewish historical commissions and documentation centers in thirteen countries gathered in Paris for a ten-day conference, in order to discuss their work and shared concerns, compare wartime experiences, and confer on documentation methods. In the end, the conference prompted them to explore the common ground they shared, and also to understand what separated them from each other.


Rival Visions: Europe or Palestine as the Center
of Holocaust Research

In May 1945, the Central Jewish Historical Commission (Centralna Żydowska Komisja Historyczna; CŻKH) in Lodz first raised the idea of a conference of Jewish historical commissions to coordinate research and publication on the recent

-160-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Collect and Record! Jewish Holocaust Documentation in Early Postwar Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 320

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.