Collect and Record! Jewish Holocaust Documentation in Early Postwar Europe

By Laura Jockusch | Go to book overview

Appendix
MAJOR PARTICIPANTS IN THE JEWISH
HISTORICAL COMMISSIONS AND
DOCUMENTATION CENTERS

This list of short biographies includes a majority of the most prominent individuals active in the Jewish historical commissions in France, Poland, Germany, Austria, and Italy. The biographies are necessarily fragmentary because of a paucity of information. Few of these activists appear in bibliographical references. Academic Holocaust studies did not recognize their work, nor did they hold public office in Europe, the United States, or Israel. Information is especially scarce for the many female commission workers. Even basic dates or births and deaths are missing for some, and often the details of wartime survival in particular remain unclear.1

Aminado, Don (Aminad Petrovich, Aminadov Peisakhovitch Shpoliansky) (1888–1957): Russian Jewish poet and satirist, born in Elizavetgrad in the Kherson Province of the Russian Empire to a lower-middle-class family. Trained in law at the University of Odessa, he came to France in 1920 and contributed as a journalist to the Tribune Juive in Paris (1920–1924). In the 1920s and 1930s he became a popular figure in the Russian (Jewish) emigre community and beyond and was awarded the Légion d’honneur in 1935 for his cultural activities. After surviving the Second World War in Montpellier and Aix-les-Bains, he joined the CDJC staff in Paris in 1945.

Asz, Menachem (Marek): Founding member and first secretary of the Jewish historical commission in Lublin in the summer of 1944 and a communist member of the Central Committee of Polish Jews. In 1946 he left Poland for the DP camps in the U.S. Zone of Germany, where he was active in the Frankfurt branch of the Central Historical Commission in Munich.

Auerbach, Rachel (1903–1976): Born in Lanowce, Galicia, then in the AustroHungarian Empire, today in Ukraine; family moved to Lvov, where Auerbach studied psychology and philosophy and became active as a journalist and editor of the

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