Pioneer Performances: Staging the Frontier

By Matthew Rebhorn | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

While this book bears only my name, many people contributed to this project and to my development as a scholar. Let me briefly thank, first and foremost, Andrew Delbanco, for his intellectual guidance, his generous support, and his productive skepticism. To Jonathan Arac, I owe special thanks for making me accountable, sometimes reluctantly, for each word I used. Rachel Adams, Katey Castellano, Amanda Claybaugh, Laura Lewis, Eric Lott, Martin Meisel, Heather Nathans, John Ott, Julie Stone Peters, Martin Puchner, David Savran, and Ezra Tawil also helped focus and sharpen my argument, and I am indebted to them for their contributions.

Productive discussions of my work at the American Dissertation Seminar and Theater Seminar at Columbia University, and at the American Studies Brown Bag Series at James Madison University, also helped illuminate the issues and contexts of my work. I would like to thank the members of those seminars for their contributions, especially Lisa Hollibaugh, Matt Laufer, Jen White, and Laura Henigman for their critical insights and their warm friendship. At the Huntington Library, I would like to thank Peter J. Blodgett for giving me an interpretive road map, and Jen Huntley-Smith, Joshua Piker, and David Wrobel for giving me the historian’s perspective. At the Harvard Theatre Collection, I’d like to thank Betty Falsey, Rachel Howarth, and Denison Beach for their tireless assistance in helping me track down primary material. To the knowledge and help of the reference librarians in the Boston Public Library, New York Historical Society, Columbia University Rare Book Room, and the New York Public Library’s Billy Rose Theatre Collection, I am also deeply indebted.

I also thank the Jacob Javits Fellowship and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for their generosity in giving me the time to develop this project, and I am likewise grateful for the support of the Stanley J. Kahrl Fellowship in Theatre History from Harvard University and the Edna T. Shaeffer Humanist Award and Faculty Leave Award from James Madison University for providing me timely support in bringing this project to a close.

Material from Chapter 1 and Chapter 4 appeared in the journals Comparative Drama and The Journal of American Drama and Theatre,

-ix-

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