Learn Sign Language in a Hurry: Grasp the Basics of American Sign Language Quickly and Easily

By Irene Duke | Go to book overview

03 / Adding Color to Your Vocabulary

CONVERSATION IS FULL of description; it’s what adds fun to the otherwise mundane. In this chapter, you will learn how to use descriptions to identify someone and to express your emotions and feelings. In addition, there will be a few dashes of color thrown in just to make it even more exciting.


Describing People

People are very different from one another. Think of how boring the world would be if everyone were the same! Things like hair color, height, and eye color are all characteristics that distinguish an individual. People use these characteristics to describe others. In sign language, there are certain rules to follow for describing people.

Descriptions of people tend to follow a particular order, and gender is always mentioned first. It is followed by the height, color of the hair and hairstyle, and body type. If the person being described has any distinguishing features, these can then also be described. For example, someone may have a very large smile, beautiful green eyes, or perhaps a certain mannerism.

The sign for “face” is formed by circling your face with the index finger. Touching or stroking your hair forms the sign for “hair.” When you want to describe someone’s hairstyle, you simply mime the hairstyle. Perhaps you have used mime when describing someone with a mustache or beard. Natural gestures serve as wonderful enhancers to signing. It is perfectly okay to use them. In fact, you are encouraged to use natural gestures, facial expressions, and body language.

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Learn Sign Language in a Hurry: Grasp the Basics of American Sign Language Quickly and Easily
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction v
  • 1- Sign Language Basics 1
  • 2- Understanding, Asking, and Answering Questions 23
  • 3- Adding Color to Your Vocabulary 41
  • 4- Playtime- Signing Sports and Venturing outside 67
  • 5- Learning Numbers and Signing Time 87
  • 6- Essential Vocabulary for Home and Abroad 117
  • Appendix A- Quizzes and Games 157
  • Appendix B- Resources 167
  • Appendix C- Glossary 175
  • Index 179
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