At the Precipice: Americans North and South during the Secession Crisis

By Shearer Davis Bowman | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1

1. See esp. Michael A. Morrison, Slavery and the American West: The Eclipse of Manifest Destiny and the Coming of the Civil War (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997), 276.

2. See C. C. Goen, Broken Churches, Broken Nation: Denominational Schisms and the Coming of the American Civil War (Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 1985), 3–9; Garry Wills, Head and Heart: A History of Christianity in America (New York: Penguin, 2007), chapter 18, “Schisms over Slavery.”

3. Peter J. Parish, The American Civil War (New York: Holmes and Meier, 1975), 66. Parish’s perspective is all the more valuable for having come from a British professor at the University of Glasgow.

4. William E. Gienapp, “The Crisis of American Democracy: The Political System and the Coming of the Civil War,” in Why the Civil War Came, edited by Gabor S. Boritt (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996), 110.

5. The votes of the Electoral College were not officially counted and announced in Washington, D.C., until 13 February 1861. As Gienapp points out, “Under the winnertake-all principle” that determined how almost all states awarded their electoral votes, “Lincoln received 98 percent of the North’s electoral votes although he won less than 54 percent of the popular vote in the free states” (ibid., 87).

6. L. E. Chittenden, A Report of the Debates and Proceedings in the Secret Session of the Conference Convention, for Proposing Amendments to the Constitution of the United States, Held at Washington, D.C., in February A.D. 1861 (New York: Appleton, 1864), 14.

7. The inconclusive evidence available to historians suggests that Lincoln’s antislavery call for containing black bondage and thereby limiting the slaveocracy’s political clout appealed most strongly to the free states’ younger voters—those in their twenties and thirties. The younger generation of voters in the slave states seem to have responded most positively to Breckinridge, the sitting vice president, whom they saw as most determined to defend southern rights. Even so, many exceptions to this generalization existed. There seems to be a growing and constructive interest in generational studies that identify age cohorts. See, for example, Peter S. Carmichael, The Last Generation: Young Virginians in Peace, War, and Reunion (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005); Yonatan Eyal, The Young America Movement and the Transformation of the Democratic Party, 1828–1861 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007).

8. James M. McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), 264.

9. Abraham Lincoln, “Proclamation Calling Militia and Convening Congress, April 15, 1861,” in Abraham Lincoln, Speeches and Writings, 1859–1865, edited by Don E. Fehrenbacher (New York: Library of America, 1989), 232.

-289-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
At the Precipice: Americans North and South during the Secession Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 379

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.