Ducktown Smoke: The Fight over One of the South's Greatest Environmental Disasters

By Duncan Maysilles | Go to book overview

8
THE SMOKE
INJUNCTION AND
THE GREAT WAR,
1914–1918

The resignation of Attorney General John C. Hart in 1910 did nothing to quell the controversy in North Georgia over injunctive relief. The issue dominated the fall elections in Fannin County when pro-copper Republicans turned out all but one of the anticopper Democrats to gain control of the county for the first time in twenty-six years. Fannin was the Georgia county closest to the copper works and suffered the worst of the smoke damage. At the same time, it had the most to lose if an injunction ended the flow of copper dollars into the local economy. All of the successful Republican candidates were well-known businessmen and professionals who saw their livelihoods at risk if the mines closed. Democrats explained the elections results by pointing to rampant vote buying, notably in the Hot House district where several leading smoke suitors lived. One witness told of an approach by a Republican campaign worker: “This is a mighty good, juicy apple. And here’s the ticket you ought to vote. After you vote that ticket eat that apple.” The voter did as he was told and discovered that “inside that apple was a fivedollar bill.” Another lifelong Democrat switched his vote when offered thirty dollars and the cancellation of his promissory note held by a bank in Copperhill. All that money had to come from somewhere, so Democrats quickly pointed fingers to the several senior mining officials currently under indictment for creating a public smoke nuisance.1

The local election results demonstrated that Hart’s strategy of patient delay on the injunction had run its course. When the Supreme Court ruled for the state in Georgia v. Tennessee Copper Co. (1907), it suggested that the copper companies be given six months to complete their acid condensation plants before it issued the final decree of injunction. Hart extended the six months to three years because of his deep reluctance to destroy the industry and its thousands of jobs. The entire thrust of his strategy had been to force adoption of technologies to abate sulfur fumes while leaving the industry viable, and acid condensation was his last and best hope because it converted harmful smelter gases into the sulfuric acid needed for the fertilizer industry.

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ducktown Smoke: The Fight over One of the South's Greatest Environmental Disasters
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 333

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.