Engines of Innovation: The Entrepreneurial University in the Twenty-First Century

By Holden Thorp; Buck Goldstein | Go to book overview

7
Academic Roles

In a nation in which many work into their late sixties and a newly minted Ph.D. is usually close to thirty, academics can expect a forty-year career. Traditionally, they know what to expect from the outset: a career of research and teaching, publishing in academic journals and books, writing grant proposals, and presenting papers at academic gatherings. These activities are often supplemented by service on departmental and university-wide committees and other administrative duties. In a relatively few cases, an academic goes into administration because the challenges are appealing or the pay is better, but most return to the academic life when their term is up. For many, this career is satisfying, and it should be. What we call the traditional scholar is the foundation of the research university.

It is a commonplace in higher education to say that good research supports good teaching, and we believe this will continue to be the case. Changes in the classroom stemming from the technological revolution mean that professors can share their expertise with a greater number of undergraduates while mentoring a group of graduate students who support their teaching and research. In the language of an entrepreneurial university, this alone increases the impact of a scholar’s work.

When scholars employ new technology to teach the basic principles and techniques of their disciplines, they have more time for matters that require direct engagement

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Engines of Innovation: The Entrepreneurial University in the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Enterpreneurial Opportunity 9
  • 2 - Enterpreneurial Science 22
  • 3 - Enterprise Creation 38
  • 4 - Social Entrepreneurship 53
  • 5 - Multidisciplinary Centers 68
  • 6 - Leadership 85
  • 7 - Academic Roles 97
  • 8 - Culture and Structure 106
  • 9 - Teaching Entrepreneurship 118
  • 10 - Accountability 133
  • 11 - The New Donors and University Development 141
  • Conclusion 151
  • Notes 155
  • Acknowledgments 161
  • Index 163
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