Engines of Innovation: The Entrepreneurial University in the Twenty-First Century

By Holden Thorp; Buck Goldstein | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Of course we said yes when our friend and editor David Perry asked us to consider writing a book about innovation and entrepreneurship in the research university. Suffice it to say we didn’t know exactly what we were getting into, and being entrepreneurs at heart we assumed it was just another problem to solve. Once the complexity of the task became clear, though, we did what we always do when faced with a difficult situation—ask for help. Fortunately, our friends and colleagues were ready and able.

Leslie Boney, Judith Cone, George Lensing, Will Baumol, and Deborah Hoover all read drafts of the manuscript from cover to cover and provided detailed and insightful comments that contributed substantially to the final product. Mary Napier read and helped shape the chapter on entrepreneurial science. John Stewart, Lowry Caudill, Julia Sprunt Grumbles, Jim Johnson, Emil Kang, Francesca Talenti, Kimberly Jenkins, and Kevin Fitzgerald all contributed to our thinking as we developed and taught courses in the minor in entrepreneurship at UNC. Our colleagues Bernadette Gray-Little, James Moeser, Jack Kasarda, Dick Krasno, Tom Kenan, Steve Jones, Tony Waldrop, Matt Kupec, Jamie May, and Doug Dibbert all offered advice and support over many years for the work that led to this book. Erskine Bowles not only provided an insightful interview that shaped our chapter on leadership but, by example, has taught us how entrepreneurial thinking can dramatically influence the trajectory of a great university system.

We are deeply indebted to those who allowed us to interview them and regret we could not include all of them in the final manuscript. Ruel Tyson, Jim Spudich, Phil Clay, John Hennessy, and Joe DeSimone gave us special insights that dramatically shaped our thinking. Special thanks go to David Burney for introducing us to the work of Roger Martin on organizational responsibility. Greg Dees provided important revisions to the chapter on social entrepreneurship. Jeff Timmons, who died before we began the book, started us along our path and suggested the magic that might be possible when entrepreneurship is added to the vast resources of a research university. Joel Fleishman provided deep insight for the chapter on the New Donors and support and enthusiasm throughout the project. Attempting to meet his high standards and expectations has been a singular challenge.

Joel Sutherland, one of our former students, and Clay Schossow, along with the students in our first-year seminar, built the website that we hope will allow conversation generated by this book to continue for some time to come. Nancy Kocher, Faye Lewis, Brenda Kirby, and Barbara Leonard pro-

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Engines of Innovation: The Entrepreneurial University in the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Enterpreneurial Opportunity 9
  • 2 - Enterpreneurial Science 22
  • 3 - Enterprise Creation 38
  • 4 - Social Entrepreneurship 53
  • 5 - Multidisciplinary Centers 68
  • 6 - Leadership 85
  • 7 - Academic Roles 97
  • 8 - Culture and Structure 106
  • 9 - Teaching Entrepreneurship 118
  • 10 - Accountability 133
  • 11 - The New Donors and University Development 141
  • Conclusion 151
  • Notes 155
  • Acknowledgments 161
  • Index 163
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