The Peninsula Campaign and the Necessity of Emancipation: African Americans and the Fight for Freedom

By Glenn David Brasher | Go to book overview

NOTES
Abbreviations
CGCongressional Globe
CWFColonial Williamsburg Foundation Archives, Oral History Collection, Williamsburg, Virginia
DukeDuke University, William R. Perkins Library, Durham, North Carolina
GBMPGeorge B. McClellan Papers, Library of Congress, Manuscripts Division, Washington, D.C.
LCLibrary of Congress, Manuscripts Division, Washington, D.C.
LVLibrary of Virginia, Richmond
ORU.S. War Department, The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies (unless otherwise noted, all references are to series 1).
SHCUniversity of North Carolina, Southern Historical Collection, Chapel Hill
USAMHIU.S. Army Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania
VHSVirginia Historical Society, Richmond
WMCollege of William and Mary, Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, Williamsburg, Virginia

Introduction

1. Washington Post, April 30, 2000; New York Times, November 15, 1997. See also Pitcaithley, “A Cosmic Threat,” 168–86.

2. Washington Post, April 30, 2000 (italics added).

3. For an interesting consideration of Civil War interpretation as reflected in various forms of modern popular culture, see Gallagher, Causes Won, Lost, and Forgotten.

4. Los Angeles Times, April 7, 2010; Washington Post, April 8, 2010. Under heavy pressure, the governor apologized for the omission and altered the proclamation to acknowledge slavery’s role in the Civil War.

5. Gallagher, “Lee to the Fore,” 6–8; Cullen, The Peninsula Campaign; Allan, Army of Northern Virginia in 1862; Freeman, Lee’s Lieutenants, vol. 1; Dowdey, The Seven Days; Sears, To the Gates of Richmond.

6. Gallagher, The Richmond Campaign of 1862; William J. Miller, Peninsula Campaign of 1862; Dougherty and Moore, Peninsula Campaign of 1862; Burton, Extraordinary Circumstances.

7. See, for example, Quarles, Lincoln and the Negro, 125–26; Grimsley, Hard Hand of War, 68–78; Gallagher, Richmond Campaign of 1862, 16–17; McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom, 489–90; McPherson, Crossroads of Freedom, 41–71; Goodwin, Team of Rivals, 462; Donald, Lincoln, 358–60.

8. Gallagher, The Union War, 121–24, asserts that because historians have often failed to successfully blend military history with the war’s social and political as-

-229-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Peninsula Campaign and the Necessity of Emancipation: African Americans and the Fight for Freedom
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.