The Works of James M. Whitfield: America and Other Writings by a Nineteenth-Century African American Poet

By James M. Whitfield; Robert S. Levine et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction

In his own time, James Monroe Whitfield (1822–71) was a celebrated African American poet and leader. He was the friend of Frederick Douglass and Martin R. Delany, and his poetry, appeared in a number of abolitionist and African American journals. In 1853, he published his first and only volume of poetry America and Other Poems, which secured his reputation among African American and abolitionist constituencies. He was profiled as a major African American poet in Delany’s The Condition, Elevation, Emigration and Destiny of the Colored People of the United States (1852), William C. Nell’s The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution (1855), and William Wells Brown’s The Black Man: His Antecedents, His Genius, and His Achievements (1863). Shortly after the publication of America, Whitfield, who regularly participated in African American conventions and meetings, emerged as a champion of the black emigration movement. His pro-emigration letters appeared in African American newspapers and were republished in pamphlet form in Arguments, Pro and Con, on the Call for a National Emigration Convention (1854). When he moved from his longtime home in Buffalo, New York, to California in late 1861 or early 1862, he was embraced by African Americans there as a black nationalist bard. He became the grand master of the Prince Hall Masons of California and was viewed by most African Americans in the Northwest as the great African American poet. Among Whitfield’s important writings of the 1860s was a commemorative poem on Lincoln and his accomplishments, which he read before thousands at a public occasion in San Francisco. An anonymous couplet published in the 1867 black

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Works of James M. Whitfield: America and Other Writings by a Nineteenth-Century African American Poet
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 239

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.