The Real ID Act: Privacy and Government Surveillance

By William Eyre | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE

Winston and Julia Smith read some of the books listed in the reference section of this work. They paid with cash, understanding that before all money became electronic, it was their best bet to hope their book purchases would raise one less flag in the national database. After reading the books they knew that the RFID readers they were sure to have encountered in the store and on their way into and out of the store would transmit the data from all the RFID tags with which their belongings were tagged (Albrecht & McIntyre, 2006). One of those belongings was sure to have been bought with a credit card.

They knew also that if an investigator investigating the identities of individuals who might have purchased various books wanted photographic “evidence,” that the digital camera feed, keyed to the bar code or RFID scanner entries for the book purchases, would give them away. The investigator could get the pictures, sound and cash register data without ever leaving his office at the Bureau of Freedom as it could be instantly accessed and sent over the Freedom Net (what had been previously called the Internet.)

The Smiths could have tried to borrow the books from the library. If the library had any copies of any of the books, the Smiths would have had to produce library cards and they would have been tied to the books that way. And their fingerprints would be in more places--on the pages of the books, “proof” that they read the books. The Smiths wondered if the video-conferencing capability on the HDTV was turned on for live surveillance, of if they were only being recorded. Not wanting to take a chance, they went into the bathroom and ran the water in the sink before they had a discussion. They may or may not have been aware that NSA had developed software to catch whispers (Bamford, 2008) and that there was software available that could separate out their speech from the background of the water running on analysis. They could write to each other on a piece of paper, and that would have probably been the best idea. Writing is time consuming but was the only reasonable attempt at a solution to the anti-surveillance problem. The Smiths would need to do so out of the field of view of the HDTV and not next to a window. If there were cameras installed at

-159-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Real ID Act: Privacy and Government Surveillance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Law and Society Recent Scholarship i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1- Surveillance Today 1
  • Chapter 2- Foundational Theory of Surveillance 65
  • Chapter 3- Total Surveillance 85
  • Chapter 4- Technology of the Real Id Act 105
  • Chapter 5- The Real Id Act- Threat to Freedom 135
  • Epilogue 159
  • References 161
  • Index 195
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 211

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.