Is a Little Pollution Good for You? Incorporating Societal Values in Environmental Research

By Kevin C. Elliott | Go to book overview

5
Lesson #2
Diagnosing Deliberation

Ortwin Renn has identified a significant problem for policy makers:

We live in a pluralist society with different value systems and worldviews.
Who can legitimately claim the right to select the values or preferences that
should guide collective decision making, in particular when the health and
lives of humans are at stake?1

The preceding two chapters make Renn’s concerns appear all the more significant. Chapter 3 shows that significant value judgments are present not only in public-policy decisions themselves but also in the scientific research that informs those decisions. Chapter 4 provides evidence that these judgments are all too often guided by deep pockets that have large amounts of money at stake in the outcomes of scientific work. In order to prevent these interest groups from having inordinate effects on academic science, the chapter proposes several responses.

One of the suggestions in chapter 4 is to develop appropriate, broadly based deliberative bodies. These forums would provide avenues for multiple stakeholders to influence the value judgments associated with research. We have already seen that Sheila Jasanoff makes a very similar suggestion. She argues that effectively incorporating science in democratic decision making requires more than just a narrow focus on the body of scientific knowledge.2 It is also important to have effective deliberative bodies that can influence the collection, interpretation, and application of scientific findings.

The present chapter develops these ideas in more detail. It begins with an overview of previous scholarship on deliberation and public participation in science and technology policy. Drawing on this background, it

1. Renn, “Model for an Analytic-deliberative Process.”

2. See Jasanoff, “Judgment under Siege.” For more discussion of the three “bodies” that contribute to the successful integration of science with politics, see the introductory chapter of this book.

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Is a Little Pollution Good for You? Incorporating Societal Values in Environmental Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - Introduction- Societal Values and Environmental Research 3
  • 2 - The Hormesis Case 18
  • 3 - An Argument for Societal Values in Policy-Relevant Research 55
  • 4 - Lesson #1 Safeguarding Science 81
  • 5 - Lesson #2 Diagnosing Deliberation 109
  • 6 - Lesson #3 Ethics for Experts 132
  • 7 - The McS and Ed Cases 160
  • 8 - Conclusion 189
  • References 201
  • Index 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.