Deus in Machina: Religion, Technology, and the Things in Between

By Jeremy Stolow | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION: RELIGION, TECHNOLOGY, AND THE THINGS IN BETWEEN
Jeremy Stolow

1. See Donald J. Mastronarde, “Actors on High: The Skene Roof, the Crane, and the Gods in Attic Drama,” Classical Antiquity 9, no. 2 (October 1990): 247–94; Rush Rehm, Tragic Greek Theatre (New York and London: Routledge, 1994), 69–71.

2. See, for instance, Aristotle, Poetics 1454a–b.

3. Whereas in ancient Greek the term mēchanê still reverberated with the connotations of its root word, mekhos (literally a “means” or an “expedient,” etymologically connected to the proto-Indo-European word magh-, “to be able,” whence also comes the term “magic”), by Roman times the word machina already had expanded its semantic terrain to include “device,” “frame,” “contrivance,” and “trick.”

4. David Hume, Dialogues and Natural History of Religion, ed. J. C. A. Gaskin (1757–1779; Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993); Ludwig Feuerbach, Lectures on the Essence of Religion, trans. Ralph Manheim (1851; New York: Harper and Row, 1967); Emile Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of Religious Life, trans. Karen E. Fields (1912; New York: Free Press, 1995).

5. Bruno Latour, On the Modern Cult of the Factish Gods (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2010), 43; see also Latour, “What Is Iconoclash? Or Is There a World Beyond the Image Wars?” in Iconoclash: Beyond the Image Wars in Science, Religion, and Art, ed. Latour and Peter Weibel (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2002), 14–37; Latour, Pandora’s Hope: Essays on the Reality of Science Studies (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1999), 266–92.

6. Matthew Engelke, “Religion and the Media Turn: A Review Essay,” American Ethnologist 37, no. 2 (2010): 371–79.

7. A landmark text in the generation of this “media turn” in the study of religion is Hent de Vries and Samuel Weber, eds., Religion and Media (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001). For overviews of religion and media as a field of research, see David Morgan, ed., Key Words in Religion, Media and Culture (New York: Routledge, 2008); and Jeremy Stolow,

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