Shakespeare and Donne: Generic Hybrids and the Cultural Imaginary

By Judith H. Anderson; Jennifer C. Vaught | Go to book overview

Improper Nouns: A Response to
Marshall Grossman

DAVID LEE MILLER

Marshall Grossman’s contribution to this collection is the snapshot of a brilliant mind cut off in midstride. Marshall was, clearly, following up on his 2009 essay, “Whose Life Is It Anyway? Shakespeare’s Prick,” which in turn builds upon Joel Fineman’s seminal work in both The Perjured Eye and The Subjectivity Effect.1 This is characteristic: Marshall’s arguments often emerged from an extended meditation on the unfinished project he calls “Fineman’s short but intense career.”2 There is an oppressive irony in the way the present occasion repeats the essential structure of that dialogue, irony wrought to a higher pitch by the turn to Hamlet’s exchange with Claudius and Gertrude, that opens “Inserting Me.” If I take this occasion to speak despite the burden such irony adds to the loss of a loved friend, it is because the silence to which I am drawn would betray the lifelong commitment to language on which, and within which, that friendship thrived.

This commitment takes a powerful, characteristic form in the poststructural postulate with which Marshall’s essay begins: “[T]he self can be possessed and confirmed only through and as acts of predication in which the immediacy of the self is sacrificed to the hegemony of its signifiers.” Marshall offers this formulation as the “profoundly linguistic discovery” shared by Shakespeare and Donne; it is also, of course, a methodological principle shared by Fineman and Grossman. To propose that the self is irreducibly mediated by language is not, however, to deny the possibility of pre- or extra linguistic subjectivity; on the contrary, it leads to the inference that the self in its immediacy may either resist or accede to the alienating identification with its signifiers. This struggle between resistance, which carries the risk of slipping out of language into silence, and acceptance, which carries the alternative risk of finding oneself bound to an alienating

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shakespeare and Donne: Generic Hybrids and the Cultural Imaginary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.