Shakespeare and Donne: Generic Hybrids and the Cultural Imaginary

By Judith H. Anderson; Jennifer C. Vaught | Go to book overview

Contributors

JUDITH H. ANDERSON is Chancellor’s Professor of English at Indiana University and author of The Growth of a Personal Voice: Piers Plowman and The Faerie Queene (1976), Biographical Truth: The Representation of Historical Persons in Tudor-Stuart Writ ing (1984), Words That Matter: Linguistic Perception in Renaissance English (1996), Trans lating Investments: Metaphor and the Dynamic of Cultural Change in Tudor-Stuart England (2005), and Reading the Allegorical Intertext: Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton (2008), which was awarded the MacCaffrey Award of the International Spenser Society; she is also coeditor of Will’s Vision of Piers Plowman (1990), Spenser’s Life and the Subject of Biography (1996), Integrating Literature and Writing Instruction: First Year English, Humanities Core Courses, Seminars (2007), and Go Figure: Energies, Forms, and Institutions in the Early Modern World (2011). Her current book project is titled Issues of Analogy, Light, and Death.

MATTHIAS BAUER is professor of English literature at the University of Tübingen, Germany. He has published numerous articles on early modern writers, including Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, and Vaughan. His book on Mystical Linguistics: George Herbert, Richard Crashaw, and Henry Vaughan is forthcoming He has also edited, with Angelika Zirker, Drama and Cultural Change: Turning around Shakespeare (2009), and he is cofounder and editor of Connotations: A Journal for Critical Debate.

MARY BLACKSTONE is professor emerita of theatre and director of the Centre for die Study of Script Development at the University of Regina, Saskatchewan, and former dean of fine arts, chair of the Canadian Association of Fine Arts Deans, and member of the board of the International Council of Fine Arts Deans. Both an early modem cultural historian and a professional dramaturge engaged in die development of new dramatic scripts for stage and screen, she has published numerous articles and chapters on Shakespeare and on topics such as religion, patronage, and women’s writing. She is currently writing a book titled The Performance of Commonwealth in Early Modern England, which treats the role of various kinds of traveling performers in developing a concept of “commonwealth.”

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