Toni Morrison: An Ethical Poetics

By Yvette Christiansë | Go to book overview

Bibliography

Abraham, Nicolas. “Notes on the Phantom: A Complement to Freud’s Metapsychology.” Trans. Nicholas T. Rand. In The Trial(s) of Psychoanalysis, ed. Françoise Meltzer, 75–80. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988.

Abraham, Nicolas, and Maria Torok. The Shell and the Kernel: Renewals in Psychoanalysis, Volume i. Ed. and trans. Nicholas T. Rand. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994.

Adell, Sandra. Double-Consciousness/Double Bind: Theoretical Issues in TwentiethCentury Black Literature. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Agamben, Giorgio. The Idea of Prose. Trans. Michael Sullivan and Sam Whitsitt. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1995.

———. Infancy and History: The Destruction of Experience. Trans. Liz Heron. London: Verso, 1993.

———. Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive. Trans. Daniel Heller-Roazen. New York: Zone Books, 1999.

Aguiar, Sarah Appleton. “‘Passing On’ Death: Stealing Life in Toni Morrison’s Paradise.” African American Review 38, no. 3 (Autumn 2004): 513–19.

Allen, Garland E. “‘Culling the Herd’: Eugenics and the Conservation Movement in the United States, 1900–1940.” Journal of the History of Biology. Published online, March 13, 2012.

Althusser, Louis. “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses: Notes Towards an Investigation.” In Lenin and Philosophy and Other Essays, trans. Ben Brewster, 127–186. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1972.

Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. Rev. ed. London: Verso, 1991.

Andrews, William L., and Nellie Y. McKay, eds. Toni Morrison’s ‘Beloved’: A Casebook. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Angelo, Bonnie. “The Pain of Being Black: An Interview with Toni Morrison.” In Conversations with Toni Morrison, ed. Danille Taylor-Guthrie, 255–61. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1994.

Ashcroft, Bill, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin, eds. The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literatures. London: Routledge, 1989.

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