Czech, German, and Noble: Status and National Identity in Habsburg Bohemia

By Rita Krueger | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I HAVE ACCUMULATED MANY intellectual and personal debts in the course of writing this book. Most recently, my editor at Oxford University Press, Susan Ferber, has been a model of startling efficiency and stylistic clarity. Her input into the final text has been invaluable. I am also grateful to the copy editor, Mary Anne Shahidi, and to Stephanie Attia and the other staff who have been so dedicated in the preparation of the manuscript. Oxford University Press’s two external reviewers provided thoughtful and constructive comments on the manuscript and contributed tangibly to its improvement.

There are many who have helped me over years of research and writing. I wish first to recognize the debt I owe my graduate school advisors, Roman Szporluk and Charles Maier, for the steady interest, intellectual support, and personal encouragement they have given me over the years. Roman Szporluk’s enduring interest in the theories of nationalism and its consequences gave my own intellectual development many of its early contours. Charles Maier’s limitless interest in critical historical questions has always been an inspiration. Olwen Hufton deserves special thanks for being the first to encourage this topic, when I had barely formulated it myself. Many readers of parts or the whole of the manuscript have given me untold help in sharpening its focus. Hugh Agnew, Catherine Albrecht, Gary Cohen, David Blackbourn, Cathleen Giustino, Eagle Glassheim, Miroslav Hroch, Jeremy King, and Larry Wolff all encountered early versions and/or parts of the manuscript, and I have gained enormously over the years from their work and their comments. Ian McNeely and Lisa Wolverton were first to read and critique the whole manuscript. Beyond their intellectual insightfulness, their friendship has sustained me over the years. In the Czech Republic, I owe a large debt

-vii-

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