Hans Von Bülow: A Life and Times

By Alan Walker | Go to book overview

First Tours of Britain—and Beyond,
1873–1875

To hell with this nomad’s life, these vagrant customs, in a word,
this virtuoso occupation!

—Bülow1


I

When Bülow first crossed Albion’s shores, in April 1873, the country was still widely regarded as ‘Das Land ohne Musik’. The profession itself was generally held in low esteem, particularly by the upper classes which had never regarded music as a fitting occupation for an English gentleman. During one of Liszt’s appearances in London, in 1840, Lady Blessington had inspected him through her lorgnette and had famously exclaimed, ‘What a pity to put such a man to the piano!’2 Amateurism was rife. The country had not produced a composer of major importance since Purcell. Despite the presence of the Royal Academy of Music, which had opened its doors in 1822, English musicians who wished to succeed usually went to the Continent to be ‘finished’, two of the favoured destinations being Paris or Leipzig, and when they returned home they often adopted foreign names in order to enjoy a better career. The Industrial Revolution had created great wealth among the middle classes, however, and foreign musicians flocked to Britain because that is where the money was to be made; they ensured that the standard of orchestral music making, especially in London, was relatively high. England’s great choral tradition was different. The rest of Europe had nothing to compare with it. The oratorios of Handel and Mendelssohn, to say nothing of lesser composers, did not receive finer performances anywhere, even in Germany.

BBLW, p. 125.

2. ACLA, vol. 1, p. 433.

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hans Von Bülow: A Life and Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.