Mrs. Dred Scott: A Life on Slavery's Frontier

By Lea Vandervelde | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

They say ev’rything can be replaced,
Yet ev’ry distance is not near.
So I remember ev’ry face
of ev’ry man who put me here.

—Bob Dylan*

Thank you,

Research Assistants: Sandya Subramanian, Bethany Berger, Susan Brehm, Chad Warren, Kris Matsumoto, Alison Harvey, Steve Wieland, Jim Sheets, Katie Rector Steffen, Mark-Andre Timinsky, Jennifer Baugh, Brad Geier, Karissa Hostrup-Windsor, Casey Jarchow, Tiana Gierke, Craig Regens, Matthew Volk, Jocelyn Cornbleet, Stephanie Fisher, Ethan Domke, Angela Johnson, Todd Johnston, David Loetz, Kenneth Price, William Ripley, and Christina Welling, Joel Brown, George Tyler Coulson, Cindy Lane, Xiaowei Li, Kristen Stoll, Thad Wilson, Jake Sadovsky.

Historians: David Konig, Mary Dudziak, William Wiecek, Leslie Schwalm, Ken Winn, Lucy Eldersveld Murphy, Father F. Paul Prucha, Kris Zapalac, Louis Gerteis, Michael Les Benedict, Austin Allen, Fred Fausz, Linda Kerber, Art McEvoy, Wayne Fields, Paul Finkelman, Bob Gordon, Mac Rohrbaugh, Sarah Hanley.

Legal Scholars and Colleagues: Peg Brinig, Akhil Amar, Len Sandler, Jerry Wetlaufer, Randy Bezanson, John Whiston, Sandy Levinson, Laura Cooper, Barbara Babcock, Peggy Cooper Davis, Adrien Wing, Mark Tushnet, Martha Mahoney, Jack Balkin, Pat Bauer, Carol Sanger.

The University of Iowa Law Library’s splendid Librarians: John Bergstrom, Mary Ann Nelson, Ted Potter, and Arthur Bonfield.

Fellow searchers of the upper Mississippi Valley Heritage: Walter “Mac” MacDonald, Walter Bachman, Mary De Julio, Regina Schantz, Scott Wolfe, Judge Mike Kirchman.

Park Rangers: Mark Kollbaum, Thomas Shaw, Bob Moore.

Venues and Hosts: Matt Pinsker, Dickinson College, Harvard University, Charles Ogletree, Washington University, St. Louis, Minnesota Federal Courts, Steven Rau, Missouri Supreme Court and the

*From “I Shall Be Released.” Copyright © 1967; renewed 1995 Dwarf Music. All rights reserved. International copyright secured. Reprinted by permission.

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