Mrs. Dred Scott: A Life on Slavery's Frontier

By Lea Vandervelde | Go to book overview

NOTES

Abbreviations
CCHRPCircuit Court Historical Records Project (St. Louis circuit court records from the nineteenth century). Available at http:// stlcourtrecords.westl.edu/resources.php
LT JournalsJournals of Lawrence Taliaferro, Minnesota Historical Society Manuscript Collection
Minn HSMinnesota Historical Society, St. Paul
Mo HSMissouri Historical Society, St. Louis
NANational Archives, Washington, DC
PCDPSt. Louis Probate Court Digitization Project, 1802–1900. Available at www.sos.mo.gov/archives/mojudicial/stl_history.as
S Accts RG 217, E 516Settled Accounts of the Army Paymaster, Research Group 217, Entry 516, National Archives

Introduction

1.60 U.S. 393 (1857).

2. These facets of Dred Scott have been explored in sources such as: Paul Finkelman, An Imperfect Union: Slavery, Federalism, and Comity (1981); Stanley I. Kutler, ed., The Dred Scott Decision (1967); Walter Ehrlich, They Have No Rights: Dred Scott’s Struggle for Freedom (1979); Don E. Fehrenbacher, The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics (1978); Dianne Lewis Heafer, A Historiographical Study of the Taney Court and the Dred Scott Decision (1985); Vincent C. Hopkins, Dred Scott’s Case (1951); Joel Parker, Personal Liberty Laws, and Slavery in the Territories (1861); Theodore Clarke Smith, Parties and Slavery, 1850–1859 (1906).

3. The Dred Scott decision played a major role in the Lincoln-Douglas debates of 1858. In the speeches leading up to the debates, Senator Stephen Douglas argued that the right to bring slaves into formerly free territory was meaningless if the local legislature and law enforcement did not enforce it. Abraham Lincoln blamed Douglas’s Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 for demonstrating a moral indifference that would eventually lead to a totally slave-holding United States. In the debates themselves, Douglas accused Lincoln of supporting full racial equality while Lincoln claimed that while he did not believe in full equality, he did profess that blacks had the right to earn their own living as whites did. David Brion Davis, Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006), 288–90.

-329-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mrs. Dred Scott: A Life on Slavery's Frontier
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.