Mrs. Dred Scott: A Life on Slavery's Frontier

By Lea Vandervelde | Go to book overview

CAPTIONS AND CREDITS

The following captions and credits pertain to illustrations that appear in the Dramatis Personae section.

Harriet Scott—Engraving from the daguerreotype taken for Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, 1857. National Park Service, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial.

Dred Scott—Albumen photograph, the only image remaining from the original daguerreotype plates taken for Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, 1857. Photographs and Prints Collection, Missouri History Museum.

Eliza and Lizzie Scott—From Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, 1857. National Park Service, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial.

Lawrence Taliaferro—Pictured in a uniform he is believed to have commissioned for himself, since no official uniform existed for Indian agents. An image of the Councilhouse appears to his left, and Fort Snelling is on his right. Minnesota Historical Society.

Elizabeth Dillon Taliaferro—Minnesota Historical Society.

George Catlin—The artist featured himself as a frontiersman in his self-portrait in Indian clothing. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of May C. Kinney, Ernest Kinney, and Bradford Wickes.

Clara CatlinSmithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC / Art Resource, NY.

Joseph Nicollet, George FeatherstonhaughMinnesota Historical Society.

Henry Hastings SibleyThomas Cantwell Healy / Minnesota Historical Society.

Samuel Pond, Gideon PondW. T. Bather / Minnesota Historical Society.

Steven and Mary RiggsMinnesota Historical Society.

Steven Bonga—Pictured in a fur hat and suit c. 1880, he served as a translator for the Ojibwa Treaty of 1837. William D. Baldwin / Minnesota Historical Society.

George Bonga—Was licensed as a fur trader to the Ojibwa. Alfred Zimmerman / Minnesota Historical Society.

William Bonga—Pictured about 1890. Minnesota Historical Society.

Jacob Fahlstrom—Reputed to be the first Swede in Minnesota. Minnesota Historical Society.

Joseph R. Brown—Charles DeForest Fredericks / Minnesota Historical Society.

Nathan Jarvis, William Beaumont—National Library of Medicine

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