Economics of Good and Evil: The Quest for Economic Meaning from Gilgamesh to Wall Street

By Tomas Sedlacek | Go to book overview

Index
1984 (George Orwell), 22, 113
65th square, 315–16
abstract-moral systems, 147
Adventures of Ideas (Alfred Whitehead), 8
agapé (divine love), 153
agnosticism, 166
Akerlof, George A., 5
Aladdin’s scientific lamp, 281
Alcibiades, 111
altruism, 271
American dream, 283
anarchy, 164
animal skin, 278
animal spirits, 13, 52, 210, 261
common interpretations, 276
heroes-in-us, 282–83
human beings as animals, 280–81
irrational, 278–80
man as machines, 281–282
shame and nakedness, 277, 277n9
as unpredictable human drives, 276
antiasceticism, 49–52
Antichrist, 133
Apostle Paul
concept of labor, 149–150
detachment from world, 144
equality in redistribution, 154
good and evil, economics of, 264
Aquinas, Thomas, 38, 84–85, 137, 253
context of evidence of God’s existence and providence, 160
on divinity, 165
on economic freedom of individuals, 158
evil decisions, 158
and ideas of Aristotle, 155–56, 158n127
mutual assistance, 164
position on matter, 156–57
private ownership, 151–52
relationship between faith and reason, 164–66
rural commerce, 166
virtues to Prudence, 145
Aristophanes, 10, 160, 259
Aristotle, 96, 104, 157, 206, 218, 241–42, 251
and Aquinas, 155–56
concept of utility as good (MaxG), 121–23
conception of citizen, 112
economic thoughts, 119
ethics of virtue, 118, 118n109
eudemonia, 119–20
on excessiveness, 226–27
on happiness, 119–20, 244
on interest, 85
on labor, 87–88
on loans, 86
management of housekeeping, 100
maximization of utility (MaxU), 120–24
principle of abstraction, 107–8
on private property, 113
on self-love, 271–72
sharp joy vs normal joy, 241
teachings, 118
understanding of philosophy and science, 117–18
Aristoxenos, 97–98
Armageddon, 309
artificial moral systems, 147
asceticism, 14, 47, 49–51, 70, 105, 114, 131, 151, 154–56, 244
ascetic societies, 48, 110

-341-

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