Ritual and Its Consequences: An Essay on the Limits of Sincerity

By Adam B. Seligman; Robert P. Weller et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction

One of the interesting, if somewhat counterintuitive, developments of the turn of the twenty-first century has been the reemergence of ritual among many sectors of society, including religious society, that had previously distanced themselves from ritual acts. For example, we see the reversal of the leaders of Reform Judaism, who have readmitted ritual to their religious practice in response to congregant demands.1 We also see the spread of orthodoxies defined in part through ritual action—orthopraxies might in fact be a better term— including the growth of Islamic identities in many regions, the worldwide increase of Jewish orthodox practice, and even the attraction in the United States of neo-paganism and Wicca, or the exponential growth of Yoga centers in cities across the country.2 The growing concern with a practical theology among mainline Protestant churches is another indicator of this trend.3 Similarly, the emergence of various forms of neo-Confucianism among Chinese intellectuals also focuses in part on the concept of li—ritual in the broad sense that includes both acts of worship and interpersonal rituals of courtesy and diplomacy.4

It is not surprising that the worldwide renewal of identities defined in part through ritual has progressed in step with a renewed interest in ritual within certain sectors of the social scientific community. Ritual has been a research focus at various times over the last century, beginning with Durkheim’s first theoretical endeavors in Elementary Forms of Religious Life.5 As with any stream of ideas, the

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ritual and Its Consequences: An Essay on the Limits of Sincerity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • About the Authors xv
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Ritual and the Subjunctive 17
  • 2 - Ambiguity, Ambivalence, and Boundaries 43
  • 3 - Ritual, Play, and Boundaries 69
  • 4 - Ritual and Sincerity 103
  • 5 - Movements of Ritual and Sincerity 131
  • Afterword 179
  • Notes 183
  • References 199
  • Index 213
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 229

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.