The Invention of Brownstone Brooklyn: Gentrification and the Search for Authenticity in Postwar New York

By Suleiman Osman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I would not have been able to complete this book without the generous help of many people. The manuscript began many years ago as a dissertation at Harvard, where I was blessed with wonderful mentors. My primary advisor, Lizabeth Cohen, read countless drafts, wrote pages of astute comments, and spent hours talking with me about the project. She continually encouraged, inspired, and challenged me. Lawrence Buell transformed the way I think about cities, introducing me to a new world of ideas about space and place, geography, and environmental criticism. His wisdom about both scholarly matters and life in general has been invaluable. I could not have completed graduate school, survived my first years of university teaching, and written this book without Bruce Schulman. A brilliant scholar, masterly lecturer, insightful editor, and generous mentor, Bruce Schulman embodies the ideal of the teacher-scholar. I cannot thank him enough for all his help.

One of the most important things I received in graduate school was a core of brilliant friends on whom I still rely on for guidance: Salamishah Tillet, Dagmawi Woubshet, Hua Hsu, and David Mulrooney. I would additionally like to thank Sonia Lee, Matthew Briones, Michael Kimmage, Kimberly Sims, Heather Lewis, Robert Breugmann, Matthew Lasner, Kevin Burke, Evelyn Higginbotham, Margaret Crawford, Julian Zelizer, Martha Nadell, Sharon Zukin, Becky Nicolaides, and others for reading and commenting on the project at different stages. From the days of being my mentor at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, Tom Sugrue has generously read and commented on different versions of the project. His insight has been invaluable.

My colleagues at the American Studies Department at George Washington University have been wonderfully supportive these past several years: Terry Murphy, James Miller, Kip Kosek, Libby Anker, Phyllis Palmer, Melani McAlister, Chad Heap, and John Vlach. Richard Longstreth, Tom Guglielmo, and Elaine Peña generously read and commented on parts of the manuscript. I could not have completed the project without them. The History Department’s Tyler Anbinder, Richard Stout, and Chris Klemek and the Geography Department’s Elizabeth Chacko and David Rain have provided important feedback about the project as well. Cartographer Nuala Cowan helped design the book’s many maps.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Invention of Brownstone Brooklyn: Gentrification and the Search for Authenticity in Postwar New York
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 3
  • 1- Urban Wilderness 17
  • 2- Concord Village 52
  • 3- The Middle Cityscape of Brooklyn Heights 82
  • 4- The Two Machines in the Garden 119
  • 5- The Highway in the Garden and the Literature of Gentrification 164
  • 6- Inventing Brownstone Brooklyn 189
  • 7- The Neighborhood Movement 233
  • Conclusion- Brownstone Brooklyn Invented 270
  • Abbreviations 281
  • Notes 283
  • Index 327
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.