The Indianapolis 500: A Century of Excitement

By Ralph Kramer | Go to book overview

In the few months since the enormous track had been carved out of 320 acres of farmland just west of Indiana’s capital city, the Fisher group had offered a smorgasbord of speed contests.

In 1910, young Theodore Myers
was a partner in Carl Fisher’s
real estate agency. Asked to
help with ticket sales, Myers
was quickly so involved with
Speedway business that he was
hired full time. Soon, “Pop”
Myers (so-named because of
his prematurely white hair) was
made general manager. For much
of the next 40 years, through
ownership changes, wars, and
other assorted crises, he was the
public face of the Speedway in
Indianapolis
.

There was something for almost everybody: motorcycles, airplanes, automobiles, and gas-filled balloons four stories high.

Fisher had declared again and again his objective in building the speedway was to provide Indianapolis carmakers, of which there were many in the first quarter of the 20th Century, a place to test and improve their products. But high board fences and huge grandstands going up, as the 2-l/2-mile rectangular strip of hardpack was going in, left no doubt there was another objective. Carl’s proving ground was actually an enormous theater. He was in the entertainment business.

Sixty thousand spectators had witnessed the gruesome first round of auto races in 1909. There had been wrecks, injuries, even death. Then followed an emergency $400,000 re-paving (3.2

Jean Chassagne flipped his Sunbeam into the tall
grass inside Turn 4 during the 1914 race
.

-12-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Indianapolis 500: A Century of Excitement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Indianapolis 500 - A Century of Excitement 1
  • Contents 5
  • Helio Castroneves- A Dream Come True 6
  • David Letterman- Memorial Day Memories 8
  • A Stroke of Genius 1911–1919 10
  • The Roaring’20s 1920–1929 28
  • Racing on a Shoestring 1930–1939 46
  • Surviving the War Years 1940–1949 70
  • Roadsters Reign Supreme 1950–1959 84
  • Engine! What? Where? 1960–1969 104
  • The Wing’s the Thing 1970–1979 130
  • The Age of Refinement 1980–1989 154
  • The Changing of the Guard 1990–1999 184
  • The Roaring 2000s 2000–2010 204
  • Where Are They Now? 236
  • Bibliography 252
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 257

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.