The Everything Guide to Government Jobs: A Complete Handbook to Hundreds of Lucrative Opportunities across the Nation

By James Mannion | Go to book overview

Chapter 21
Testing One, Two, Three

You have perused the pages of this book and now have an idea about what kind of government job would be most appropriate and interesting for you. You know how to write an effective cover letter and how to tailor your resume to catch the eye of your prospective employer. You’re ready to ace that interview! Now on to the next step. It’s time to go back to the classroom to take a test.


Civil Service Tests

As you have learned throughout this book, government jobs exist at the federal, state, county, city, and local level. In many cases, part of the application process is sitting for a written test. There are also other tests, depending on the kind of job. Notification about the results of civil service tests is posted in a variety of places. There is an opening date and a closing date for applications to take the test, and you have to file within that time frame. There is often a nonrefundable fee to take the test.

Job bulletins or announcements are posted at government offices, sometimes published in newspapers, and almost always posted on the Internet. For local government jobs, you may often find posters in local stores. For example, announcements for upcoming New York City police and fire department tests are advertised on city buses and subways. And New York City has a weekly newspaper called The Chief that prints nothing but civil service tests listings.

You should call the government agencies in your area. You can find many of these agencies in the telephone book and on the Internet. If you find a job opportunity, and the agency is not taking applications at this time, you can ask to be notified when applications will be taken by filling out a request. Many agencies provide e-mail notification.

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Everything Guide to Government Jobs: A Complete Handbook to Hundreds of Lucrative Opportunities across the Nation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.