Civic Passions: Seven Who Launched Progressive America (and What They Teach Us)

By Cecelia Tichi | Go to book overview

NOTES

ABBREVIATIONS
BLJohn J. Burns Library, Boston College, Boston
BPLouis Dembitz Brandeis Papers, Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, University of Louisville, Louisville, Ky.
FHSFilson Historical Society, Louisville, Ky.
HPAlice Hamilton Papers, Schlesinger Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
IBWIda B. Wells Papers, Joseph Regenstein Library, University of Chicago, Chicago
NCLNational Consumers’ League Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
WCWarshaw Collection, Smithsonian National Museum of American History, Washington, D.C.

PREFACE

1 Louis Uchitelle, “The Richest of the Rich, Proud of a New Gilded Age,” New York Times, July 15, 2007, 1, 18–19. Douglas, “Forbes 400.”

2 “Personal Account,” Harper’s, 16 (“unusual and unfortunate situation… too much sense”).

3 See Uchitelle, Disposable American.

4 Tindall and Shi, America, 862, 863 (“Bosses of the Senate”). On lobbyists, see Continetti, K Street Gang, 16. On the average sum spent to lobby Congress for each day of the 2008 session, see “Harper’s Index,” Harper’s, 13.

5 A survey of anti-immigrant sentiment from the nineteenth century appears in Tichi, Embodiment of a Nation, 36–47. Typical nativist sentiments of the first Gilded Age appear in Strong, Our Country. See also Gerstle, American Crucible. Early twenty-firstcentury groups variously advocated the restriction of immigrants into the United States, the deportation of immigrants who lacked authentic documentation, the denial of health care or education to them or to their children, and the denial of processes of legalization (denounced as “amnesty”) or of U.S. citizenship to such immigrants. The groups include the American Immigration Control Foundation, Californians for Population Stabilization, the Federation for American Immigration Reform, NumbersUSA, Americans for Legal Immigration, and the Immigration Reform Law Institute. For a summary of the activities of some of these groups, see Nicole Gaouette, “An Immigration End Run around the President,” Los Angeles Times, June 23, 2008, A9.

-289-

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Civic Passions: Seven Who Launched Progressive America (and What They Teach Us)
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Two Gilded Ages - A Preface xi
  • Danger and Opportunity - An Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Dangerous Trades 29
  • 2 - The Pittsburgh Survey 57
  • 3 - Justice, Not Pity 89
  • 4 - The Wages of Work 123
  • 5 - Citizen 164
  • 6 - The Social Gospel 205
  • 7 - Lynching in All Its Phases 240
  • Progressive Encore? - A Postscript 275
  • Suggested Reading 287
  • Notes 289
  • Bibliography 349
  • Acknowledgments 375
  • Index 377
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