David to Delacroix: The Rise of Romantic Mythology

By Dorothy Johnson | Go to book overview

Notes
In-text translations are the author’s unless otherwise noted.

Introduction

1 For studies of mythology in literature and writings, its importance and its transformations, see Manuel, The Eighteenth Century Confronts the Gods; and Starobinski, “Fable and Mythology.” See also Feldman and Richardson, Rise of Modern Mythology; and Canat, L’Hellénisme des Romantiques.

2 See Arizzoli-Clémentel, “Les arts du décor,” 281–312; Nouvel-Kammerer, Symbols of Power; and Nouvel-Kammerer, D’après l’antique.

3 Mythologized political portraits commissioned by Napoleon and his family have been superbly analyzed by Johns, in Antonio Canova, 88–122; and “Portrait Mythology,” 115–29.

4 “Il est d’autres livres exposés aux yeux de tout le monde; les tableaux, les estampes, les tapisseries, les statues. Ce sont autant d’énigmes pour ceux qui ignorent la fable, qui souvent en est l’explication et le dénouement. Il n’est pas rare que dans les entretiens on parle de ces matières.” Rollin, Traité des études, Book VI, Part 4. Discussed in Starobinski, “Fable and Mythology,” 170.

5 Starobinski, “Fable and Mythology,” 170–71. “Voilà pourquoi la connaissance, du moins une connaissance superficielle de la fable, est si générale. Nos spectacles, nos pièces lyriques et dramatiques et nos poésies en tout genre, y font de perpétuelles allusions; les estampes, les peintures, les statues qui décorent nos cabinets, nos galleries, nos plafonds, nos jardins, sont presque toujours tirées de la fable…. La fable est le patrimoine des arts.” Jaucourt, “Mythologie.”

6 See Gaehtgens and Lugand, Joseph-Marie Vien; and Gaehtgens, “David et son maître Vien.”

7 De Caso has studied the continuity and disruption of mythological subjects in late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century sculpture. See Statues de chair; and David d’Angers.

8 See especially Manuel, The Eighteenth Century Confronts the Gods; and also Badolle, L’Abbé Jean-Jacques Barthélemy.

9 “Chose feinte et inventée pour instruire et pour divertir.” Dictionnaire de l’Académie française, 2:421; cited and discussed by Le Leyzour, “Myth and Enlightenment.”

10 “La religion et le bon sens nous ont désabusés des fables des Grecs; mais elles se maintiennent encore parmi nous par le moyen de la poésie et de la peinture, auxquelles il semble qu’elles aient trouvé le secret de se rendre nécessaires.” Fontenelle, De l’origine des fables, 35.

11 Banier, Explication historique des fables.

12 Fénelon, Les aventures de Télémaque.

13 Bailey, Loves of the Gods, 46–47.

14 “Tous les ouvrages de la Nature ont été les premières divinités des mortels.” Rous-

-193-

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