For the Freedom of Her Race: Black Women and Electoral Politics in Illinois, 1877-1932

By Lisa G. Materson | Go to book overview

Notes

Abbreviations

The following abbreviations are used in the notes.

CABPClaude A. Barnett Papers, Chicago Historical Society
HMFPHanna-McCormick Family Papers, Manuscripts Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
HQBPHallie Q. Brown Papers, Hallie Q. Brown Memorial Library, Central State University, Wilberforce, Ohio
IMGPIrene McCoy Gaines Papers, Chicago Historical Society
IWPIllinois Writers Project: “Negro in Illinois” Papers, Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature, Carter G. Woodson Regional Public Library, Chicago
MCTPMary Church Terrell Papers, Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, Howard University, Washington, D.C.
NACWPRecords of the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs, 1895–1992, Part 1: Minutes of National Conventions, Publications, and President’s Office Correspondence, ed. Lillian Serece Williams and Randolph Boehm (Bethesda, Md.: University Publications of America), microfilm
NHBPNannie Helen Burroughs Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
WDNCPWomen’s Division of the Democratic National Committee Papers, 1933–1944, Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York

Introduction

1 “Mr. Elmnm and Ella Elmnm,” [n.d.], box 10, folder 28, IWP.

2 Ibid.

3 Between 1880 and 1920, an average of 73 percent of black men and women employed in the state worked in agriculture. Close to 90 percent of women not engaged in farm labor earned a very modest income as either domestics or laundresses. Fon Louise Gordon, Caste and Class, 64–69, 84–85.

4 I have not been able to locate documentation of Ella Elm’s birth date. I have situated Elm within the chronology of Arkansas’s disfranchisement battles according to the

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