Living the Revolution: Italian Women's Resistance and Radicalism in New York City, 1880-1945

By Jennifer Guglielmo | Go to book overview

5

Anarchist Feminists
and the Radical Subculture

By the time Maria Roda immigrated to Paterson, New Jersey, from Italy in 1893 she was already a local hero. Only two years earlier, at the age of fifteen, she had gained notoriety when Italian authorities accused her of singing seditious songs and carrying on “like she was possessed” at a labor rally in Milan among silk weavers. News of her trial traveled throughout the international anarchist movement, not only because of her youth and the harshness of her sentencing (she served three months in prison) but for her “defiant attitude” toward the judge, to whom she gave a piece of her mind.1

A self- described anarcho- socialist at a young age, Roda had been forced to grow up fast. She entered the textile mills as a child, in the northern Italian city of Como, upon the premature death of her mother. She found solace in the local anarchist scene, and her commitment to revolutionary activism only deepened as she grew older. At nineteen, she joined her father and three sisters and migrated to Paterson, located about twenty miles west of Manhattan. All became immediately active in the Gruppo Diritto all’Esistenza (Right to an Existence Group), one of the largest and most influential Italian anarchist groups in North America.2 Soon thereafter, Maria and several other women in the movement formed a Gruppo Emancipazione della Donna (Women’s Emancipation Group). They did so, Roda stated at the time, “because we feel and suffer; we too want to immerse ourselves in the struggle against this society, because we too feel, from birth, the need to be free, to be equal.”3

News of the Paterson women’s group traveled quickly via one of the most popular Italian- language anarchist newspapers in the United States, La Questione Sociale.4 Through the press, Roda invited women throughout Italy’s many proletarian diasporas to meet on their own as well.5 Within a short time, similar groups sprouted up in Italian immigrant neighborhoods in New York City, Hoboken,

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Living the Revolution: Italian Women's Resistance and Radicalism in New York City, 1880-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 404

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.