Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands

By Juliana Barr | Go to book overview

© 2007 The University of North Carolina Press
All rights reserved

Designed by Heidi Perov
Set in Minion by Keystone Typesetting, Inc.
Manufactured in the United States of America

Publication of this book was aided by a grant from the Program for Cultural
Cooperation between Spain’s Ministry of Culture and United States Universities.

The paper in this book meets the guidelines for permanence and durability of
the Committee on Production Guidelines for Book Longevity of the Council on
Library Resources.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Barr, Juliana.
Peace came in the form of a woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas
borderlands / Juliana Barr.

p. cm.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

ISBN-13: 978-0-8078-3082-6 (cloth: alk. paper)

ISBN-13: 978-0-8078-5790-8 (pbk.: alk. paper)

1. Indians of North America—Texas—History—18th century. 2. Indian
captivities—Texas—History—18th century. 3. Spaniards—Texas—History—18th
century. 4. Missions, Spanish—Texas—History—18th century. 5. Women and
peace—Texas—History—18th century. 6. Women—Texas—Social conditions—18th
century. 7. Diplomacy—Texas—History—18th century. 8. Texas—History—To
1846. I. William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies. II. Title.
e78.t4b37 2007
976.4004%97—dc22 2006027686

Portions of this work appeared previously, in somewhat different form, as
‘’Beyond Their Control: Spaniards in Native Texas,” in Choice, Persuasion, and
Coercion: Social Control on Spain’s North American Frontiers
, ed. Jesús F. de la Teja
and Ross Frank (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2005), 149–77;
‘’A Diplomacy of Gender: Rituals of First Contact in the ‘Land of the Tejas,’ ”
William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd ser., 61 (July 2004): 393–434; and “From
Captives to Slaves: Commodifying Indian Women in the Borderlands,”
Journal of American History 92 (June 2005): 19–46 and are reprinted here with
permission of the publishers.

cloth 11 10 09 08 07 5 4 3 2 1
paper 11 10 09 08 07 5 4 3 2 1

-iv-

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