Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands

By Juliana Barr | Go to book overview

acknowledgments

In writing this book, I have been the beneficiary of the aid and goodwill of numerous individuals and institutions. A Summerfield-Roberts Fellowship from the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University got me off to a great beginning, as it provided the opportunity to exchange ideas with a group of scholars who also focus their work on the multicultural realms of the Southwest. The department of history and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers University and the department of history at the University of Florida granted sabbaticals that gave me sustained periods of time in which to revise much of the manuscript. A year spent as a faculty fellow at Rutgers’ Institute for Research on Women in 2001–2 offered a collegial space within which to explore questions concerning the intersections of race and gender.

A veritable host of archivists have shown me unstinting generosity and knowledgeable direction as I completed research and later gathered maps and illustrations. I gratefully thank Ralph Elder, John Wheat, and Steven Williams at the Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin, Kinga Perzynska and Susan Eason at the Catholic Archives of Texas, John Anderson at the Texas State Library and Archives, Susan Danforth and Leslie Tobias-Olsen at the John Carter Brown Library, Roy Goodman and Robert Cox at the American Philosophical Society, Carolyn Spock at the Texas Archeological Research Laboratory, Mary Linn Wernet at the Cammie G. Henry Research Center at the Eugene P. Watson Memorial Library on the campus of Northwestern State University, Patricia Mercado-Allinger at the Texas Historical Commission, Beth Standifird at the San Antonio Conservation Society, Amy Verheide and Cary McStay at the Fray Angélico Chávez Library and Photo Archives at the Palace of the Governors, John O’Neill at the Hispanic Society of America, and Shane Culpepper at the Gilcrease Museum. I thank Melissa Beaver at the Journal of American History for designing the four maps that appear in this book. I would also like to express my appreciation to Dan Flores, Jack Jackson, George Sabo,

-ix-

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