Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics, and the Pennsylvania Campaign

By Kent Masterson Brown | Go to book overview

was ever patient. He always believed that I would accomplish the task. David Perry, editor in chief at the Press, has been encouraging and patient as well.

All along the way I was helped by others. Barbara Wright of Charlottesville, Virginia, Alan Nolan, and the late William Woods Hassler encouraged me when it seemed as though the project would never get off the ground, and then they cheered me on as the work progressed. Thank you for your friendship and all the wonderful memories.

Countless individuals contributed a steady stream of documents for me to refer to, including Fletcher L. Elmore Jr. of Louisville, Kentucky; William Turner of Lanham, Maryland; James and Judy Philpot of Lexington, Kentucky; Ken Lawrence M.D. of Orwell, Ohio; Loring Shultz of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; Lieutenant Colonel Hans Henzel of Fairfield, Pennsylvania; B. F. Moore of Cincinnati, Ohio; John H. Krohn Jr. of Wilmington, North Carolina; Richard Keith Irish of Marshall, Virginia; J. J. Fraboni of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; David Schwartz of Staunton, Virginia; Michael S. Saks of Providence, Rhode Island; William C. Blackwell of Hagerstown, Maryland; Georgie Lee Blackwell Heizer of Danville, Kentucky; Bob Lurate of Lexington, Virginia; Gary Hendershott of Little Rock, Arkansas; Hunt B. Jones M.D. of Louisville, Kentucky; John Michael Priest of Hagerstown, Maryland; Clyde Wilson at the University of South Carolina; James McClellan of Farmville, Virginia; Michael A. Gureasko of Cincinnati, Ohio; Lewis Leigh Jr. of Leesburg, Virginia; B. Seward Totty of Lexington, Kentucky; and Sam and Wes Small of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Robert Rosen of Charleston, South Carolina, and Marshall Krolick of Chicago, Illinois, sent me material on such personalities as Dr. Simon Baruch, Dr. Alexander Bear, Major Raphael Moses, and Major John Medill. General William A. Tidwell of Fairfax, Virginia, graciously gave me copies of Captain George M. Emack’s letters, family history, and photographs. Likewise, my friend Ben Ritter of Winchester, Virginia, copied rare diaries for me and helped me find some unknown sources that were of great help in the development of this narrative. The late David V. Young M.D. of Washington,

D. C., helped me understand the world of nineteenth-century medicine and the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Todd Bowman and Jane Hershey of Williamsport, Maryland, helped me solve the mystery surrounding the location of Otho Williams’s farm at Williamsport, and Ms. Hershey graciously copied many Williams documents and even provided a photograph of the Williams house, Rose Hill, as it looked in the nineteenth century. I am very grateful.

One cannot write about the Gettysburg campaign without consulting

-xii-

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