Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics, and the Pennsylvania Campaign

By Kent Masterson Brown | Go to book overview

Ten
Nowhere is safe

When the First Brigade of Kilpatrick’s Division struck Chambliss’s troopers in the streets of Hagerstown, General Buford’s cavalrymen back near Boonsboro were preparing to remount. While waiting for the bugle call, Sergeant Redman finished a letter home to his mother. “We shall leave here in a few minutes,” he wrote, “to go where I cannot tell. I hope to fight the Rebs. I am only satisfied nowadays when I am fighting the enemy. The proper time to fight him is while he is on our northern soil. I shall kill every one of them that I can.”1

Bugles sounded, and Buford’s troopers doused their fires, emptied their coffeepots, and remounted for what promised to be the most trying part of their operation. In the distance they could hear the boom of artillery and the rattle of musketry as Kilpatrick struggled against the Confederate defenders at Hagerstown. Buford’s three cavalry brigades and two artillery batteries headed up the muddy, deeply rutted road to Williamsport. The sky was dark and rain was falling. General Merritt’s depleted brigade led the advance, followed by Captain Graham’s Battery K. Behind Graham’s Battery rode Colonel Gamble’s Brigade with Lieutenant Calef’s Battery. Colonel Thomas S. Devin’s Brigade brought up the rear of the column. The blue cavalrymen crossed Antietam Creek over the stone bridge that spans the famous stream at “Devil’s Backbone” and then followed the road as it led over ridges and down valleys until they came to a village where the road crossed the Hagerstown-Sharpsburg Turnpike, known as “Jones’s Crossroads.”2

Buford’s vedettes at Jones’s Crossroads reported that Confederate pickets were posted ahead along the road in a valley near St. James College. From the head of the column all the way to the rear, officers gave the troopers the signal to prepare for action. Pistols and carbines were checked to make sure

-234-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics, and the Pennsylvania Campaign
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 534

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.