Shifting Loyalties: The Union Occupation of Eastern North Carolina

By Judkin Browning | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

So many people read all or parts of this manuscript at different times and offered valuable comments and criticisms that I fear I cannot thank them all enough. John Inscoe read every chapter minutely and always gave sound advice and extraordinary encouragement; he is both a mentor and a good friend. James C. Cobb, Kathleen Clark, Peter Charles Hoffer, Thomas G. Dyer, Ronald E. Butchart, David Perry, Solomon K. Smith, Bruce Stewart, and Tim Silver each provided direction, suggestions, and constructive criticisms that greatly improved the final product. Jane Turner Censer and Robert Kenzer commented on part of this manuscript when it was a paper delivered at the Southern Historical Association, while George Rable and Susannah Ural did the same for various paper presentations at Society for Military History conferences. I thank Steve Batterson, a gifted writer in another genre, who constantly challenged me to become a better writer. I also thank the two anonymous readers for the University of North Carolina Press for offering significant commentary that helped me revise, refine, and polish the manuscript.

This book could not have been written without much financial aid to fund many research trips. I would particularly like to thank the University of Georgia (UGA) for a Presidential Fellowship and a Dean’s Award in Humanities; the North Caroliniana Society for an Archie K. Davis Scholarship; the Southern Historical Collection for a J. Carlyle Sitterson Research Grant; the Colonial Dames for an American History Scholarship; the U.S. Center for Military History for its generous fellowship; Appalachian State University for a University Research Council Grant; the UGA History Department for a Warner-Fite Scholarship, and especially Dr. Robert Pratt, who, as UGA’S History Department chair, granted me several individual travel funds to aid me in my research.

The research for this project required me to go many places up and down the eastern seaboard, and I have been fortunate to be helped by numerous

-xi-

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Shifting Loyalties: The Union Occupation of Eastern North Carolina
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1- Antebellum Antecedents 9
  • Chapter 2- The First Year of War 27
  • Chapter 3- The Beginning of Military Occupation 55
  • Chapter 4- The African American Experience under Occupation 81
  • Chapter 5- The Experience of Northern Benevolent Societies during Occupation 105
  • Chapter 6- The Effects of Occupation on Union Soldiers 123
  • Chapter 7- White Rejection of Union Occupation 149
  • Conclusion 177
  • Notes 183
  • Bibliography 219
  • Index 239
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