Shifting Loyalties: The Union Occupation of Eastern North Carolina

By Judkin Browning | Go to book overview

INDEX
African Americans: assertions of independence, 81, 83; celebrate Emancipation Proclamation, 88–89; conflict with whites, 81, 89–90, 168; efforts to acquire education, 100–106, 110; employment of, 90–96; enlistment in Union army, 96–100; escape from slavery, 85–90; industrious efforts of, 170; intimate relations with Union soldiers, 132; legal rights granted to, 168; marry legally, 89; negotiate enlistment terms, 97–98; numbers in Union army, 99; plunder New Bern, 57; racial ideology of inferiority of, 132; racism of Union soldiers toward, 123; religious practices of, 117–20, 205 (n. 30); resist white preachers, 118; robust community in settlements of, 93–95; seize white property, 84–85; as servants, 92; as spies, 91; suffrage for, 171; utilize benevolent societies for material gain, 120–21; whites angry at enlistments of, 169; whites resent freedoms of, 168–71 See also Slaves
African Brigade, 99
Albany, N.Y., 108
Allen, George H., 149, 150
American Freedmen’s Inquiry Commission, 87
American Missionary, 83
American Missionary Association, 83, 117, 120, 203 (n. 2); arrives in region, 102, 105; closes schools for yellow fever, 111; conflicts between teachers of, 106, 112–14; correspondent records school closing, 101; demand for teachers of, 109; disagreement over religious practices, 118; hardships for teachers of, 102, 110–11; history of, 108; opens schools in New Bern, 107; preconceptions of African Americans, 119–20; recognizes importance of African American enlistment, 96; records African American education experience, 103; requirements for teachers, 108; sexual indiscretions by teachers of, 113; teachers leave region, 111; teachers pictured, 109; white threats against teachers of, 110
Anderson, Jack, 134
Andrew, John, 99, 124
Andrews, Sidney, 1
Andrews Battery, 36, 50
Annie Grey, 160
Antietam, battle of, 80, 130, 142
Appomattox, 171
Army of the Potomac, 126
Arnold, Easton, 72, 73
Ash, Stephen V., 197 (n. 45)
Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad, 17, 51, 56
Atlantic Hotel (Beaufort), 30, 32, 50, 66, 196 (n. 27)
Averasboro, N.C., 125
Bachelor Creek, 128
Baltimore, Md., 16
Bank of New Bern, 55
Bank of North Carolina (New Bern), 44
Baptists, 116, 117

-239-

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Shifting Loyalties: The Union Occupation of Eastern North Carolina
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1- Antebellum Antecedents 9
  • Chapter 2- The First Year of War 27
  • Chapter 3- The Beginning of Military Occupation 55
  • Chapter 4- The African American Experience under Occupation 81
  • Chapter 5- The Experience of Northern Benevolent Societies during Occupation 105
  • Chapter 6- The Effects of Occupation on Union Soldiers 123
  • Chapter 7- White Rejection of Union Occupation 149
  • Conclusion 177
  • Notes 183
  • Bibliography 219
  • Index 239
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