The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South

By Dylan C. Penningroth | Go to book overview

Chapter Five
Remaking Property

The end of the Civil War laid bare a set of wrenching questions about property. Years of half-hidden struggle had settled into fragile, yet widely recognized customs that gave slaves claims of access to land and a portion of their labor time. Slaves, masters, and other whites had built a system of owning and trading property that was anchored not in the law but in the yards and back roads of everyday life. The ending of slavery threw these complex understandings and practices into question. What was property? Who owned it? And what did ownership mean? Wherever black people turned—working a crop, buying a cow, renting a house, or even getting compensation for things soldiers had taken from them—they confronted new ideas about property. Black life after slavery involved intense, far-reaching negotiation with northern bureaucrats, white landlords, and other black folk about the ownership and meaning of property.

IN 1865, FORMAL LAW seemed poised to sweep aside extralegal understanding as the anchor of black people’s claims to property. For the first time since their ancestors made the Middle Passage, African Americans had the legal right to own property. White people had always cherished their property rights, and they had shoved the slaves’ economy off to a legal netherworld

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.