Wounds of Returning: Race, Memory, and Property on the Postslavery Plantation

By Jessica Adams | Go to book overview

Introduction

Times don’t change, just the merchandise.
Sarah Graves, Federal Writers’ Project Slave Narrative

On a sunny summer day early in the twenty-first century, trains on the Norfolk Southern line rattle from the freight yards above St. Claude Avenue down Press Street toward the river. Along the levee, the New Orleans Public Belt Railroad runs between oil tankers and warehouses, passing the front porch of the meticulously restored Lombard Plantation—“one of the best-preserved West Indian-style Creole residences in the state”—featured in an 1882 Scribner’s article by Lafcadio Hearn on the scenes of George Washington Cable’s “romances.”1 The Desire streetcar line has come and gone, the sweep of its tracks still visible in the asphalt. The fields where sugarcane grew in the 1700s and 1800s have been replaced by shotgun houses, bars, Catholic churches, and public schools that saw bitter struggles over desegregation when Plessy was reversed in 1954. In 1960, white students marched down St. Claude bearing the Confederate flag, singing “Glory, Glory Segregation” to the tune of the Battle Hymn of the Republic to protest the integration of what was the all-white Francis T. Nicholls High (named for a Confederate soldier), which became the almost all-black Frederick Douglass.2

Cruise ship passengers standing at the rails of their gleaming vessels gaze out across the city blocks spread below them. As they travel slowly toward Caribbean destinations, they get a glimpse of the Chalmette Battlefield, a scene from the War of 1812, fought against a backdrop of cane fields, slave cabins, and big houses with carefully landscaped gardens.3 Today, the site is marked by an imposing stone obelisk. A cemetery containing the graves of

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wounds of Returning: Race, Memory, and Property on the Postslavery Plantation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Prologue xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Sex and Segregation 21
  • 2- Plantations without Slaves 54
  • 3- Roadside Attractions 86
  • 4- Southern Frontiers 108
  • 5- Stars and Stripes 135
  • Epilogue 159
  • Notes 161
  • Bibliography 195
  • Index 217
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.